Peter Lindbergh | Milla Jovovitch

Posted: January 15th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Photography

Milla Jovovitch, New York, Italian Vogue, 1996 © Peter Lindbergh

Milla Jovovitch, New York, Italian Vogue, 1996 © Peter Lindbergh

Milla Jovovich, 1998 © Peter Lindbergh

Milla Jovovich, 1998 © Peter Lindbergh

Milla Jovovich © Peter Lindbergh

Milla Jovovich © Peter Lindbergh

Milla Jovovich © Peter Lindbergh

Milla Jovovich © Peter Lindbergh

Milla Jovovich © Peter Lindbergh

Milla Jovovich © Peter Lindbergh

Milla Jovovich, Italian Vogue, Paris, 1998  © Peter Lindbergh

Milla Jovovich, Italian Vogue, Paris, 1998 © Peter Lindbergh

Milla Jovovich, Italian Vogue, Paris, 1998  © Peter Lindbergh

Milla Jovovich, Italian Vogue, Paris, 1998 © Peter Lindbergh

Karen Elson and Milla Jovovich in "L.A. Report" for Vogue Italia, October 2000 © Peter Lindbergh

Karen Elson and Milla Jovovich in "L.A. Report" for Vogue Italia, October 2000 © Peter Lindbergh

Karen Elson and Milla Jovovich in "L.A. Report" for Vogue Italia, October 2000 © Peter Lindbergh

Karen Elson and Milla Jovovich in "L.A. Report" for Vogue Italia, October 2000 © Peter Lindbergh

Milla Jovovich, Vogue Paris, 1990 © Peter Lindbergh

Milla Jovovich, Vogue Paris, 1990 © Peter Lindbergh

Milla Jovovich © Peter Lindbergh

Milla Jovovich © Peter Lindbergh

Milla Jovovich, Italian Vogue, 2000 © Peter Lindbergh

Milla Jovovich, Italian Vogue, 2000 © Peter Lindbergh

Milla Jovovich, Italian Vogue, 2000 © Peter Lindbergh

Milla Jovovich, Italian Vogue, 2000 © Peter Lindbergh


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Robert Doisneau | 1912 – 1994

Posted: January 13th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Film, Painting, Photography, Quotes

La poule en laisse © Robert Doisneau

La poule en laisse © Robert Doisneau

Danse © Robert Doisneau

Danse © Robert Doisneau

When I was photographing fashion for Vogue, against a white background, I was only acting a part. Watching a fashion show never gave me any particular emotion, never made me think : “I must absolutely photograph that woman, in that dress”. Besides, models weren’t as friendly as they are now, they always seemed to look down on the little man at the other side of the camera, who was only trying to get his photo.

- Robert Doisneau

 

Le ruban de la mariée, 1951 © Robert Doisneau

Le ruban de la mariée, 1951 © Robert Doisneau

Les animaux superieurs, 1954 © Robert Doisneau

Les animaux superieurs, 1954 © Robert Doisneau

I’ve made every possible mistake. Because I don’t like to obey orders and I always question what I’m told. So I have to try out everything for myself, and that has lead me into many dead ends.

- Robert Doisneau

 

Les frères, rue du Docteur Lecène, Paris 1934 © Robert Doisneau

Les frères, rue du Docteur Lecène, Paris 1934 © Robert Doisneau

Yes, the expectation of a miracle. It’s very childish, but at the same time it’s almost like an act of faith. We find a backdrop and wait for the miracle. I remember a backdrop that never worked for me, possibly because I didn’t wait long enough, or didn’t return to it often enough. In the foreground you can see the steps of Saint Paul’s church, the background is a perfect faubourg, as you imagine them from literature or movies. I frame it in my viewfinder, from rue de Turenne to a shop called Le Gant d’Or, and wait there for an hour, sometimes two, thinking, “my God, something is bound to happen”. I imagine events I would like to photograph, one wilder than the other. But nothing happens, nothing. Or if it does – bang – it’s so different from what I expected that I miss it. The miracle did take place, but I wasted it, because I didn’t pay the right kind of attention. When you are tired, you become unable to react, your emotion is no longer available.

- Robert Doisneau

 

Bois Bouloigne ©  Robert Doisneau

Bois Bouloigne © Robert Doisneau

Plenty. I couldn’t count all my hours of mad hope, while expecting the miracle to happen. Hardly a week goes by without at least one day of photography. But sometimes I have the feeling that I’m hounded by a curse. It took me five years to get sacked by Renault – though I had done all I could to that purpose – and three months later war was declared and my freedom was lost again. Now, that I don’t have to waste my time with advertising photos, or with complying to the demands of magazines, my wife’s illness has fallen on me. For the last ten years, this has detained me from using my time as I wanted. It’s like a fatality. Still, I believe that constraint, and the feeling of exasperation that comes with it, can also become a stimulus to create.

- Robert Doisneau

 

Concours du plus beau tatouage 1950 © Robert Doisneau

Concours du plus beau tatouage 1950 © Robert Doisneau

The advantage we have, compared to painters and writers, is that we never lose contact with the rough side of life. It is a lesson in humility and it keeps us from some pitfalls. But above all it nourishes us. Other people’s vitality nourishes us, without their knowledge. It has done me good to work on this project in Saint-Denis, to find myself in the streets again, face to face with people. Though I must say that I found them less friendly than twenty years ago, possibly because of today’s photographers, who hold their cameras like weapons – so of course the rabbit on the other side doesn’t feel too good. I wouldn’t dare shoot as they do, I don’t have William Klein’s nerve. Sometimes the camera pulls me along, but once I’ve got my photo I wonder, “How am I going to cope with this now, how can I explain it to these people?”

- Robert Doisneau

 

Mademoiselle Anita 1951 © Robert Doisneau

Mademoiselle Anita 1951 © Robert Doisneau

Paris © Robert Doisneau

Paris © Robert Doisneau

[Using a Rollei] You ended up bowing before the subject, as if in prayer. Whereas with a 35mm camera, you put him straight in your line of fire – that is in your line of sight, so as to shoot right into his face. And if you aren’t quick enough, this may annoy him and he will agress you. I understand it now, as more and more often people tend to photograph me, it’s like the attractiveness of old ruins, you become picturesque without wanting to. So I realise what it feels to have such a machine pointed at you : if you stick your finger up your nose – click – your fellow photographer won’t miss it.

- Robert Doisneau

 

Trépidante Wanda 1953 © Robert Doisneau

Trépidante Wanda 1953 © Robert Doisneau

Sunday morning in Arcueil 1945 © Robert Doisneau

Sunday morning in Arcueil 1945 © Robert Doisneau

A memory from my youth comes back to me. You go into the woods on a bike, with a girl. There is the smell of heather, you can hear the wind in the fir trees, you don’t dare tell her about your love, but you feel happy, as if you were floating above the ground. Then you look at the clouds beyond the trees and they are fleeting. And you know that within an hour you’ll have to go home, that tomorrow will be a working day. You wish you could stop that moment for ever, but you can’t, it is bound to end. So you take a photo, as if to challenge time. Maybe the girl will move to another town and you will never see her again, or you will see her changed, tired, humiliated by her everyday life, working as a salesgirl in some shop, with a boss always shouting at her. To me, this desire to preserve the moment seems justified, in spite of that German priest mentioned by Gisèle Freund, who pretends that the photographic image is a sacrilege.

- Robert Doisneau

 

Paris © Robert Doisneau

Paris © Robert Doisneau

I had a few problems with the law. It appears that people have rights about their own image, and this often prevents me from catching their spontaneity. So I must stop them and say, “I noticed you while passing by, would you mind kissing again?” That’s what happened with the “Hôtel de Ville lovers”, they re-enacted their kiss. Those with the grocer were a couple I hired.

- Robert Doisneau

 

Le Baiser de l'Hôtel de Ville 1950 © Robert Doisneau

Le Baiser de l'Hôtel de Ville 1950 © Robert Doisneau

The “Hôtel de Ville lovers” were part of a series, on which I had already worked for a week and which I had to complete with two or three photos of that kind. But the fact that they were set up never bothered me. After all, nothing is more subjective than l’objectif (the French word for “lens”), we never show things as they “really”are. The world I was trying to present was one where I would feel good, where people would be friendly, where I could find the tenderness I longed for. My photos were like a proof that such a world could exist.

- Robert Doisneau

 

Créatures de Rêves, 1952 © Robert Doisneau

Créatures de Rêves, 1952 © Robert Doisneau

L'enfant Papillon 1945 © Robert Doisneau

L'enfant Papillon 1945 © Robert Doisneau

Les écoliers de la rue Damesme, Paris 1956 © Robert Doisneau

Les écoliers de la rue Damesme, Paris 1956 © Robert Doisneau

My photographs show the world as I would like it to be.

- Robert Doisneau

 

Montbéliard © Robert Doisneau

Montbéliard © Robert Doisneau

Picasso et Françoise Gilot, 1952 © Robert Doisneau

Picasso et Françoise Gilot, 1952 © Robert Doisneau

Les Enfants de la Place Herbert, 1957 © Robert Doisneau

Les Enfants de la Place Herbert, 1957 © Robert Doisneau

We must always remember that a picture is also made up of the person who looks at it. This is very, very important. Maybe this is the reason behind those pictures that haunt me and that haunt many people as well. It is about that walk that one takes with the picture when experiencing it. I think that this is what counts. One must let the viewer extricate himself, free himself for the journey. You offer the seed and then the viewer grows it inside himself. For a long time I thought that I had to give the entire story to my audience. I was wrong.

- Robert Doisneau

 

Georges Braque a Varengeville Normandy, 1953 © Robert Doisneau

Georges Braque a Varengeville Normandy, 1953 © Robert Doisneau

La dent, Paris 1956 © Robert Doisneau

La dent, Paris 1956 © Robert Doisneau

Le cadran scolaire, Paris 1956 © Robert Doisneau

Le cadran scolaire, Paris 1956 © Robert Doisneau

I’m not sure that total freedom is such a good thing. When you have to rely on yourself for living, you accept all kinds of assignments. But you cannot help glancing to the right or to the left, as if playing some game with the working hours that you owe your employer – and in the end the photos worth preserving are the ones you stole from his time.

- Robert Doisneau

 

La voiture fondue,1944 © Robert Doisneau

La voiture fondue,1944 © Robert Doisneau

Georges Braque a Varangeville, 1953 © Robert Doisneau

Georges Braque a Varangeville, 1953 © Robert Doisneau

La poterne des peupliers,1932 © Robert Doisneau

La poterne des peupliers,1932 © Robert Doisneau

The world I was trying to present was one where I would feel good, where people would be friendly, where I could find the tenderness I longed for. My photos were like a proof that such a world could exist.

- Robert Doisneau

 

Fernand Leger dans ses oeuvres © Robert Doisneau

Fernand Leger dans ses oeuvres © Robert Doisneau


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Mario Testino | Kate Moss by Mario Testino

Posted: December 1st, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Books, Photography, Quotes

Mario Testino’s monograph / testimonial to Kate Moss was released in September 2010 in a limited run of 1,500 signed copies, each going for $2,000.

 

I met Kate very early on. Shortly after her first Galliano show I went backstage to congratulate her, only to find her crying: she was disappointed that she had only been given one outfit to model in the show. My answer to her was this: ‘In life there are perfumes and colognes. You need to use lots of cologne as the scent fades away; with a perfume you just use a drop and it lasts all night. You are a perfume, you will go on and on.’ Little did I know just how true that would become! And that I had made a friend for life.

- Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

I thought it was on a shoot for French Glamour [that Mario and I first met], but he always says it was when I did a John Galliano show and I was crying on the steps or something.

- Kate Moss

 

Kate Moss by Mario Testino for Vogue Brazil May 2011

Kate Moss by Mario Testino for Vogue Brazil May 2011

Mario took me to a new level of glamour. I don’t think anybody had seen me as any kind of sexy model before he did. He was the one that transformed me. Before him I was just a grungy girl, but he saw me differently. He was the first to say ‘Oh, she’s quite sexy. I’ve seen her out! I know she’s not just that grungy girl.’ He’d seen me in a pair of heels, getting glamorous – and he was the first to start taking pictures of me in that way. He changed the way people thought about me as a model, for sure. Later other people started working with me in that way, but he was the first.

- Kate Moss

 

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

She lives more fully than anyone else I know.

- Mario Testino

 

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

This is just a couple of months ago. We were doing photos and we were hungry, so she made an omelette. She’s quick at making an omelette! It was a moment. Kate’s very loose with her body – not in a negative way, but in a comfortable way. I come from Peru and had a Catholic upbringing. I wasn’t raised to be comfortable with nudity. British people are a funny mix. They pretend to be prudish but they can be pretty decadent – as long as you close enough doors. I guess Kate doesn’t need the closed doors. She’s just free. It’s her nature.

- Mario Testino

 

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

This is not the picture I was meant to do, it’s an in-between picture. We were doing shoot and I said: ‘All right I’ve got it’, and shy threw herself back on the bed, my paparazzi side came out – and this is the picture. It’s a relaxing shot between striking the pose. It’s where you get to see our relationship, where it’s not the magazine, or the editorial. It’s about us. Kate’s confidence is magical because it’s full of insecurities – she’s very frail. Even when she’s trying to be most sexy grown –up, the childishness in her always come out. I feel very protective towards her.

- Mario Testino

 

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

I have never laughed so much in my whole life as with Mario on shoots. Sometimes we know we have to stop but we just can’t, we can’t even look at each other.

- Kate Moss

 

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

I guess back when we met I did not realize she would become an icon of the ‘now’ for so many people. All I could see or feel was an attraction to someone a lot younger than me.

- Mario Testino

 

Lila Grace and Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Lila Grace and Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

… and I like the pictures [in this book] of me and Lila too. At the time they were taken, she was really young, and I didn’t want the press intruding on her, they were too private… but now the pictures are nostalgic for me.

- Kate Moss

 

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

We have been trying to work out exactly where this party is [the image below]. I think it is in New York, but it could be London or Cannes. It’s a long time ago, but I know this face so well – you know, with the mouth wide open when you scream hello. I’ve know Kate for over 20 years (our first job was for France Glamour when she was only 15) and the friendship I share with her is very intense. It’s different sort of friendship. It’s not like I see her every weekend, or we go out every night, but when we see each other. It’s always the same. This image encapsulates how I see Kate. It’s totally her. She’s so at ease. That’s the side I like. I like her sexy, and I her different, but many of those sides are a front. This is the reality.

- Mario Testino

 

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

In the press people say “oh, there she is… she’s out again”, and they don’t see me getting up and going to work every day. They just print pictures of me coming out of a party or whatever… I’ve worked hard for 20 years and I’m still working now! The book has a really good balance of work and play and shows that the fashion industry is not the completely vicious place it is so often made out to be. I don’t think it is at all.

- Kate Moss

 

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

This was taken in my office while doing a story for Italian vogue. I wanted to bring Kate into my world and photograph her in a way that redressed her, so we decided to do the shoot using the portrait on my book. I carried on taking pictures after we had finished and this is one of those. The picture she is holding was the poster for my exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery. It’s become quite an iconic picture for us, because the exhibition has travelled all over the word and she has always been the face of the show. I thought it was cute to do her quite real, in this way, but with this face.

- Mario Testino

 

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

This was shot at the Royal Opera House for American vogue. It didn’t appear in the magazine, we just did it for a laugh. Kate was asking: ‘How would I have been if I was a dancer? With the tutu and a crown on? She’s so sweet like that ,no? She is you all- time English girl, I love her because she doesn’t come from money. She comes from a very normal background. I’ve always found that’s made her quite balanced. And as much as I can appreciate her style and her beauty, the thing that has made our relationship is her sense of humor. We laugh a lot. All the time. That is our relationship, I guess.

- Mario Testino


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Irving Penn | Lisa Fonssagrives

Posted: May 7th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Film, Photography, Quotes

It is always the dress; it is never, never the girl. I’m just a good clothes hanger.

-Lisa Fonssagrives

Woman in Palace (Lisa Fonssagrives-Penn), Marrakech, Morocco © Irving Penn, 1951

Woman in Palace (Lisa Fonssagrives-Penn), Marrakech, Morocco © Irving Penn, 1951

Lisa Fonssagrives-Penn, February Vogue © Irving Penn, 1950

Lisa Fonssagrives-Penn, February Vogue © Irving Penn, 1950

Lisa Fonssagrives-Penn © Irving Penn

Lisa Fonssagrives-Penn © Irving Penn

Lisa Fonssagrives-Penn, Harlequin Dress © Irving Penn, 1950

Lisa Fonssagrives-Penn, Harlequin Dress © Irving Penn, 1950

Lisa Fonssagrives-Penn © Irving Penn, 1949

Lisa Fonssagrives-Penn © Irving Penn, 1949

Lisa Fonssagrives © Irving Penn

Lisa Fonssagrives © Irving Penn


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Tom Palumbo | Contact Sheets

Posted: January 24th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Film, Photography

There is nothing more naked than seeing a photographer’s contact sheets. Here are a few from the great editorial shooter Tom Palumbo who was a staff photographer with Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar.

Anne St. Marie Contact Sheet, Tom Palumbo

Anne St. Marie Contact Sheet, Tom Palumbo

Anne St. Marie Contact Sheet, Tom Palumbo

Anne St. Marie Contact Sheet, Tom Palumbo

Contact Sheet, Tom Palumbo

Contact Sheet, Tom Palumbo

Contact Sheet, Tom Palumbo

Contact Sheet, Tom Palumbo

Contact Sheet, Tom Palumbo

Contact Sheet, Tom Palumbo


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Ellen von Unwerth | Jean Seberg

Posted: May 25th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Books, Cinema, Photography, Quotes

For more than twenty-five years, Ellen Von Unwerth has celebrated movies through her fashion photography. Her photographs are generally straightforward, without special effects of the allusion to a more complicated narrative; she simply uses characters from noted films as the protagonists of her fashion essays, such as the piece for the October 1990 issue of Vogue (available here, wm) in which models are used to reincarnate Jean Seberg and Jean-Paul Belmondo in Jean-Luc Godard’s New Wave counterculture film Breathless (1959). Von Unwerth’s fashion essay concentrates on the breezy life of the doomed lovers as they tool around Paris riding a motor scooter, smoke at cafés, and snuggle in bed. Von Unwerth exploits readers’ identification with the characters in the film, especially the generation that came of age in the 1960s, when European culture and bohemian antiestablishment lifestyle were the vogue. More specifically, the New Wave French films radically changed the way movies were made. They were consonant with the disjunctive and nonlinear literature of the time. Their off-beat characters (often based on American movie gangsters) and the details of their behavior and dress helped create an identity for members of the American couterculture.

-Susan Kismaric & Eva Respini, Fashioning Fiction

<i>Jean Seberg</i> with Christy Turlington, October, 1990 Vogue, Ellen von Unwerth

Jean Seberg with Christy Turlington, October, 1990 Vogue, Ellen von Unwerth

<i>Jean Seberg</i> with Christy Turlington, October, 1990 Vogue, Ellen von Unwerth

Jean Seberg with Christy Turlington, October, 1990 Vogue, Ellen von Unwerth

<i>Jean Seberg</i> with Christy Turlington, October, 1990 Vogue, Ellen von Unwerth

Jean Seberg with Christy Turlington, October, 1990 Vogue, Ellen von Unwerth

<i>Jean Seberg</i> with Christy Turlington, October, 1990 Vogue, Ellen von Unwerth

Jean Seberg with Christy Turlington, October, 1990 Vogue, Ellen von Unwerth

<i>Jean Seberg</i> with Christy Turlington, October, 1990 Vogue, Ellen von Unwerth

Jean Seberg with Christy Turlington, October, 1990 Vogue, Ellen von Unwerth

<i>Jean Seberg</i> with Christy Turlington, October, 1990 Vogue, Ellen von Unwerth

Jean Seberg with Christy Turlington, October, 1990 Vogue, Ellen von Unwerth

<i>Jean Seberg</i> with Christy Turlington, October, 1990 Vogue, Ellen von Unwerth

Jean Seberg with Christy Turlington, October, 1990 Vogue, Ellen von Unwerth

<i>Jean Seberg</i> with Christy Turlington, October, 1990 Vogue, Ellen von Unwerth

Jean Seberg with Christy Turlington, October, 1990 Vogue, Ellen von Unwerth

<i>Jean Seberg</i> with Christy Turlington, October, 1990 Vogue, Ellen von Unwerth

Jean Seberg with Christy Turlington, October, 1990 Vogue, Ellen von Unwerth

<i>Jean Seberg</i> with Christy Turlington, October, 1990 Vogue, Ellen von Unwerth

Jean Seberg with Christy Turlington, October, 1990 Vogue, Ellen von Unwerth


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Ellen von Unwerth | Audrey Tautou

Posted: May 13th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Photography, Quotes

“Fabelhaft” with Audrey Tautou in German Vogue, April 2002.

Technique undoubtedly helps make photography magical, but I prefer to work with atmosphere. I think that the obsession with technique is a male thing. Boy’s toys. They love playing… but once you’ve perfected something you have to start searching for a new toy. I would rather search for a new model or location.

-Ellen von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth


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Ellen von Unwerth | Her Best Shot

Posted: February 15th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Photography, Quotes

From The Guardian:

I took this maybe three years ago, on a fashion shoot for Italian Vogue. We developed a romantic story to go with it: a woman comes back to the place where she grew up, and finds it all dusty and falling apart. We shot it in a chateau in Paris. The girl was a model, and it was the only time I worked with her. After this, she disappeared. She was from eastern Europe, Romania maybe, and even the agency could’t find her again. So she’s like a ghost. The picture certainly has a ghostly feeling.

I love a picture that surprises you: you try to get everything perfect, then somehow it ends up looking wrong. That’s why I love this one. It was taken with a Polaroid, one of those beautiful things that no longer exist. The light has caused the blurriness, giving the shot extra emotion. There’s something eerie about it, too: the girl’s expression is both vulnerable and strong.

I was a model for 10 years before becoming a photo-grapher. That certainly helps me now. I always felt bad in front of the camera, having to pose in particular ways – when all I wanted to do was something silly. So now I love it when models move, when they express themselves, when they play.

I love beautiful women. I love to show their personality, their sexuality. There’s a fashion side to my erotic pictures: I love beautiful shoes and jewellery. But the erotic work I do is too daring and provocative for a fashion magazine. It’s more fun, and if you have the right girl who likes it, more exciting, too. It’s fashion photography, but with fewer clothes.

-Ellen von Unwerth

'She disappeared after this' … from Fräulein, by Ellen von Unwerth

'She disappeared after this' … from Fräulein, by Ellen von Unwerth


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