Lina Scheynius | Diary & Others

Posted: July 3rd, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Film, Photography, Quotes

I started out by posting pictures of myself and my ex boyfirend and friends on flickr and on this website. I was really just doing it because I loved doing it. Some people started to post my work on their blogs, and it started to spread over the internet. One day (in 2008) a photographer’s agent found my work through one of the blogs and contacted me. She was wondering if I would be interested in doing it professionaly. Absolutely terrified, and not at all sure if it was a good idea, I said yes. Two weeks later I had my first job from her – a portrait of Charlotte Rampling for Dazed and Confused. And since then it has been a lot of more work , and here I am. It is pretty much all thanks to the internet though.

- Lina Scheynius

Double © Lina Scheynius

Double © Lina Scheynius

Diary Summer © Lina Scheynius

Diary Summer © Lina Scheynius

I get ideas while walking in big cities or forests listening to good music.

- Lina Scheynius

© Lina Scheynius

© Lina Scheynius

© Lina Scheynius

© Lina Scheynius

I tend not to think too much about what I am doing, if I see something that interests me I shoot it. I like bringing my camera into situations people wouldn’t normally bring a camera. And I like showing people in moments and moods they wouldn’t show out in public.

- Lina Scheynius

Diary Summer © Lina Scheynius

Diary Summer © Lina Scheynius

I usually shoot people that I know pretty well and therefore already have developed a trusting relationship with. It’s important for me that they can feel relaxed, but also that I can!

- Lina Scheynius

© Lina Scheynius

© Lina Scheynius

I only ever work with light sources that exists in our everyday life and never use my flash. I am very interested in light of every form, and how it can change a place, a situation, a mood or even an object.

- Lina Scheynius

© Lina Scheynius

© Lina Scheynius

I love using this type of photography! I love anything where the result can surprise you. I just wish it wasn’t so bloody expensive and hard to hunt down the Polaroids.

- Lina Scheynius

Behati Prinsloo for Anthropologie ©  Lina Scheynius

Behati Prinsloo for Anthropologie © Lina Scheynius

My dad was taking a lot of pictures of us as kids and I used to always want to borrow his camera. There are a few pictures in our family albums of my family’s heads and a great space of nothing above them. When I turned 10 I got my own camera and finished two rolls of film that same day. Since then I have just kept doing it. It comes very natural to me. Probably more so than brushing my hair!

- Lina Scheynius

Mariacarla in Paris 2008 © Lina Scheynius

Mariacarla in Paris 2008 © Lina Scheynius

When I work on my personal pictures the viewer doesn’t enter my mind until I start the selection process for my website. And even then I try to not think about him or her. If I did, I think a larger section of my work would remain unseen, as a lot of it is extremely personal to me and not initially captured to be viewed by others, but more as you mentioned, to document. Or experiment. I guess that it is my almost forced disregard of the viewer that gives you the impression that I am fearless.

- Lina Scheynius

© Lina Scheynius

© Lina Scheynius

We had a photobook at home that used to fascinate me. It’s by photographer Åke Hedström and called ‘Emma’. It’s a father’s photographs of his very allergic daughter. She dies after eating a brazilnut. Extremely sad but amazing photography.

- Lina Scheynius

Me in London © Lina Scheynius

Me in London © Lina Scheynius

But I am definitely not someone who has a camera around at all times. Fact is that I take very few photographs, and I am very selective when I take them. I don’t hunt for images. I let them come to me through moments in my life, and occasionally I create them.

- Lina Scheynius

Diary © Lina Scheynius

Diary © Lina Scheynius

I don’t actually have a favourite photographer. I like quite a few but I get more inspiration from painters like Egon Schiele. I love his work for leaving me feeling slightly uncomfortable. And also because it feels very real and intimate.

- Lina Scheynius

Red13 © Lina Scheynius

Red13 © Lina Scheynius

There is a tiny section on my website called “red” with photographs against a pink sky. I was in my room on the phone to one of my best friends and noticed how amazing the sky looked so I told my friend to hold on for a sec, and then I climbed out on the roof with my Polaroid camera and very quickly shot some self-portraits against the sky. That is exactly how I love working.

- Lina Scheynius

© Lina Scheynius

© Lina Scheynius

For my magazine work I try to always work in an as similar process as possible to my personal work. I like to keep it intimate by working in really small teams of people that I enjoy having around. I also try to be spontaneous and not plan anything more than where I will be and who I will be there with. Furthermore I want it to be fun and I never take 100 similar versions of the same picture. I was a model before I became a photographer and I think the process of most fashion shoots I have been on is very draining and gives a pretty stale result. Usually there are too many people around all trying to do an amazing job and too much time is spent on things in general.

- Lina Scheynius

Diary Summer © Lina Scheynius

Diary Summer © Lina Scheynius

In my opinion the instant itself can never be changed. Yes, bringing out a camera has already made the moment different from if one hadn’t brought it out. But the fact that there is a photograph of it doesn’t change what happened. Only perhaps the memory of it. My memory of it. The importance of it in relation to other instances that might be similar but not remembered.

Bringing in a viewer gives the instant even more importance in relation to others. It doesn’t really make the single picture more important to me. I am not sure, but it could even be the contrary as it is no longer a secret personal thing but some kind of official object.

But the image itself gets a new and perhaps more important life with all these eyes viewing it and hopefully relating to it in whatever way.

On another note I have noticed that bringing out these instances in public has an effect on the future ones. For better or worse.

- Lina Scheynius

Calender © Lina Scheynius

Calender © Lina Scheynius

Diary Autumn © Lina Scheynius

Diary Autumn © Lina Scheynius

© Lina Scheynius

© Lina Scheynius

I have never experienced any problems due to my lack of education. Things have happened very quickly for me and there has never been anyone asking for a paper where I can prove my skills or merits. I personally don’t have much faith in creative education and I am very happy I have never chosen to do one.

- Lina Scheynius

Calendar © Lina Scheynius

Calendar © Lina Scheynius

Krysty Hume © Lina Scheynius

Krysty Hume © Lina Scheynius

Me in Shanghai © Lina Scheynius

Me in Shanghai © Lina Scheynius


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André Kertész | New York City, 1979

Posted: February 17th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Film, New York City, Photography, Quotes

André Kertész | <i>New York City, 1979</i>

André Kertész | New York City, 1979

Everything that surrounds you can give you something. Last summer I stayed in my room most of the time and I began playing around with things. Years ago I was given a little primitive Polaroid camera and I didn’t like it–it was for snapshots. But one day I took it out. I had discovered, in the window of a shop, a little glass bust, and I was very moved because it resembled my wife–the shoulder and the neck were Elizabeth. For months and months I looked at the bust in the window and I finally bought it. The lady in the shop said, ‘It’s a beautiful bust, sir.’ ‘I know,’ I said. And I took it home, put it in my window, and began shooting and shooting with the Polaroid camera–in the morning, in the afternoon, in different lights. Something came out of this little incident, this little object. They made a book of all the pictures I took. It is dedicated to my wife. Look how the face of the bust is always changing: a shadow, which is the shadow of the curtain, then a passing cloud.

The sky and its reflection give it the expression. I didn’t arrange this thing–it was “there”. Photography cannot make nature more beautiful. Nature is the most beautiful thing in the world. You can show the beauty, illustrate it, but it is never the real beauty–very far from it. We don’t know how beautiful nature really is. We can only guess. I am always saying the best photographs are those I never took.

-André Kertész, Kertész on Kertész


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Ellen von Unwerth | Her Best Shot

Posted: February 15th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Photography, Quotes

From The Guardian:

I took this maybe three years ago, on a fashion shoot for Italian Vogue. We developed a romantic story to go with it: a woman comes back to the place where she grew up, and finds it all dusty and falling apart. We shot it in a chateau in Paris. The girl was a model, and it was the only time I worked with her. After this, she disappeared. She was from eastern Europe, Romania maybe, and even the agency could’t find her again. So she’s like a ghost. The picture certainly has a ghostly feeling.

I love a picture that surprises you: you try to get everything perfect, then somehow it ends up looking wrong. That’s why I love this one. It was taken with a Polaroid, one of those beautiful things that no longer exist. The light has caused the blurriness, giving the shot extra emotion. There’s something eerie about it, too: the girl’s expression is both vulnerable and strong.

I was a model for 10 years before becoming a photo-grapher. That certainly helps me now. I always felt bad in front of the camera, having to pose in particular ways – when all I wanted to do was something silly. So now I love it when models move, when they express themselves, when they play.

I love beautiful women. I love to show their personality, their sexuality. There’s a fashion side to my erotic pictures: I love beautiful shoes and jewellery. But the erotic work I do is too daring and provocative for a fashion magazine. It’s more fun, and if you have the right girl who likes it, more exciting, too. It’s fashion photography, but with fewer clothes.

-Ellen von Unwerth

'She disappeared after this' … from Fräulein, by Ellen von Unwerth

'She disappeared after this' … from Fräulein, by Ellen von Unwerth


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