Sante D’Orazio | A Private View

Posted: November 7th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Film, Painting, Photography

What happened to Sante?

13 years ago when his book A Private View came out, he was the shit, at the top of his game and the industry, gracing the covers of all the major magazines, shooting choice editorials with the top celebrities and models at the time.

I rarely see his name these days and the editorials I do see feature second-tier subjects. His work used to be so playful, sensual and light. There was a warmth in his portraits and a lushness in his black & white work. Some of the recent work that I’ve seen is flat and cold, and very anonymous.

Regardless, his book A Private View is a shooting diary of his work with some personal notes, outtakes, and lists of films shot. It is a book full of charm and beauty.

Kate Moss © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Kate Moss © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Kate Moss © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Kate Moss © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Kate Moss © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Kate Moss © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Christy Turlington © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Christy Turlington © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Christy Turlington © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Christy Turlington © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Christy Turlington © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Christy Turlington © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Julian Schnabel © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Julian Schnabel © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Julian Schnabel © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Julian Schnabel © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Carla Bruni © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Carla Bruni © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View


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Frank Frazetta | 1928-2010

Posted: May 11th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Books, Painting, Quotes

The great pulp painter Frank Frazetta died yesterday. His brushstrokes were the literal entrance into the world of pulp novels when I was a kid. A Frazetta cover would herald the different worlds inside those cheap mass market pages, enthralling me as a suburban kid, reading Robert E. Howard and Lovecraft and others.

He may have been the first artist I actively sought out, not to buy paintings or monograms but to purchase cheap Dell paperbacks with those fantastic luminous covers.

Here are some of his more famous paintings. I will post a collection of his sketches, pencil drawings and pen and ink work which I always favored, maybe because the deftness of his hand was so readily apparent.

Rest in peace, Frank. And thank you.

Note: two great articles in the Los Angeles Times on Frazetta, one by Lance Laspina, the director of Frazetta: Painting with Fire and one by Guillermo del Toro

Wild Ride, Frank Frazetta

Wild Ride, Frank Frazetta

When it came to my art, I went my own way and did not follow the trends.

-Frank Frazetta

Flesh Eaters, Frank Frazetta

Flesh Eaters, Frank Frazetta

Winged Terror, Frank Frazetta

Winged Terror, Frank Frazetta

Captive Princess, Frank Frazetta

Captive Princess, Frank Frazetta

By the time I was a teenager, I knew I wanted to be an artist. I was a born draftsman and liked all forms of art, so I just knew that’s what I wanted to do.

-Frank Frazetta

Man Ape, Frank Frazetta

Man Ape, Frank Frazetta

Christmas, Easter, and Thanksgiving were my big days. I guess I drew more Santa’s, bunnies, and turkeys on blackboards than anyone could count. At the insistence of one of my teachers, my parents enrolled me in the Brooklyn Academy of Fine Arts when I was eight. The Academy was little more than a one floor/three room affair with a total of thirty students ranging in age from eight–me!–to eighty. I still remember the Professor Michele [Michael] Falanga’s look of skepticism as I signed in. He was rolling his eyes and you could almost see the thought balloon over his head, “Oh no! Not another child prodigy!” He sat me down with a pencil and paper and asked me to copy a postcard featuring a group of realistically rendered ducks. When he returned later to see how far I had progressed, he snatched up my drawing exclaiming, “Mama mia!” and ran off waving it in the air, calling everyone over to look at it. I thought I was in some kind of trouble.

-Frank Frazetta

The Destroyer, Frank Frazetta

The Destroyer, Frank Frazetta

He [Falanga] died when I was twelve, right about the time he was making arrangements to send me off to Italy at his own expense to study fine art. I haven’t the vaguest idea of whether it would have really affected my areas of interest. I don’t know, but I doubt it. You see, we never had any great conversations. He might look over your shoulder and say. “Very nice, but perhaps if you did this or that…” He spoke very broken English and he kind of left you on your own. I think I learned more from my friends there, especially Albert Pucci. Falanga would look at some of the comics stuff I was doing and say, “What a waste, what a waste! You should be in Italy and paint the street scene and become a very famous fine artiste!” And that didn’t thrill me! After he died the students tried to keep the school going; we had become such close friends that we couldn’t bear to close up shop so we all chipped in and paid the rent and continued to hold classes. I did nude life drawings and still lifes; we’d paint outdoors. It was all totally different from the way I work now, but it taught me a lot about brush technique and perspective and helped me to develop my own style.

-Frank Frazetta

Lost City, Frank Frazetta

Lost City, Frank Frazetta

When I was about 15 someone in my family introduced me to John Giunta. He was a professional artist who was working for Bernard Bailey’s comics publishing company and he really wasn’t a very personable guy. He was very aloof and self-conscious and hard for me to talk to, but he was really very talented. He had an exceptional ability, but it was coupled with a total lack of self-confidence and an inability to communicate with people. Being around him really opened up my eyes, though, because he was really that good. He had an interesting style, a good sense of spotting and his blacks worked well. You can see a lot of his influence even today in some of my ink work.

-Frank Frazetta

Frankenstein and Dracula, Frank Frazetta

Frankenstein and Dracula, Frank Frazetta

Deathdealer II, Frank Frazetta

Deathdealer II, Frank Frazetta

Deathdealer I, Frank Frazetta

Deathdealer I, Frank Frazetta

I hope my work has inspired young artists. I have always tried to maintain my freedom as an artist and I feel it is one of the main reasons I have been successful.

-Frank Frazetta

Conan the Avenger, Frank Frazetta

Conan the Avenger, Frank Frazetta

Chained, Frank Frazetta

Chained, Frank Frazetta

When Ralph [Mayo] took over he pulled me aside and said, “Frank, you stuff is great, but you need to learn some anatomy.” When I was in school with Falanga the emphasis was on feeling, not on the nuts and bolts, so I really didn’t understand what he meant by ‘anatomy.’ So Ralph handed me an anatomy book and when I went home that night I had decided to learn anatomy. I started with page one and copied the entire book – everything in one night, from the skeleton up. I came back the next day like a dumb kid and said, “Thank you very much, I just learned my anatomy.” Of course Ralph fell over and roared with laughter. “Frankie, you silly bastard! I’ve been studying for ten years and I still don’t know anatomy, and you went home and learned it last night?!” But the thing was I had learned an awful lot. I had the ability to absorb things and he saw an improvement in my work right away. It amazed him and that meant a lot to me. From that point on I developed pretty rapidly: I started to do things with figures that made sense. I worked for Mayo and Standard for a few years, doing things like “Looie Laziebones” and all the funny animal stuff.

-Frank Frazetta.

Catgirl, Frank Frazetta

Catgirl, Frank Frazetta

The Cave Demon, Frank Frazetta

The Cave Demon, Frank Frazetta

What I do is create images, period.

-Frank Frazetta

The Snow Giants, Frank Frazetta

The Snow Giants, Frank Frazetta


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Joe Sorren’s Paintings

Posted: September 25th, 2009 | Author: | Filed under: Painting, Quotes

I first became aware of Joe Sorren’s work at Storyopolis in West Hollywood, that amazing children’s bookstore which has since relocated to the valley. What other kids book store has original Dr. Seuss drawings and vintage New Yorker cartoons?

There were two pieces hanging on a column at Storyopolis that caught my eye. They were the two posted below, “Those Two Guys…” and “Opus” which are now available at La Luz de Jesus gallery in Los Feliz. Sorren’s work reminds me of those completely rare picture books I read as a kid that instead of simple adventures involving backyards and rabbits, were stories that were surreal and wild and scary and took me to places beyond what I could have imagined.

His paintings are a gentle moment of LSD lucidity with broad strokes of humor and playfulness and in each, underneath the surreal patina, a touch of something darker and sadder.

"Those Two Guys That Everyone Wishes They Had At Their Party", Joe Sorren

"Those Two Guys That Everyone Wishes They Had At Their Party", Joe Sorren

"Opus", Joe Sorren

"Opus", Joe Sorren

I love the fact that all bets are off when you paint; the idea that anything can happen captivates me.

-Joe Sorren

"Elliot's Attraction to All Things Uncertain", Joe Sorren

"Elliot's Attraction to All Things Uncertain", Joe Sorren

Joe-Sorren

Unknown Title, Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

Unknown Title, Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

Unknown Title, Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

Unknown Title, Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

Unknown Title, Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

"When She Was Camera", Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

Unknown Title, Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

"Bump", Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

"Astrea", Joe Sorren

I usually enter a painting with no ideas, and just begin applying paint to see what arrives. I find art to be most engaging when I am surprising myself. As long as I stay open for whatever to arrive, anything can show up for dinner.

-Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

"Anthologia", Joe Sorren

joe-sorren2

Unknown Title, Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

Unknown Title, Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

Unknown Title, Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

"Jammer", Joe Sorren

"Glimmer", Joe Sorren

"Glimmer", Joe Sorren

"Butterflies", Joe Sorren

"Butterflies", Joe Sorren


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