Articles Tagged with: New York City
Joel Meyerowitz | Black & White Work
Wyoming, 1964 © Joel Meyerowitz

Wyoming, 1964 © Joel Meyerowitz

The best way is to look at the ‘old guys’ like Brassaï and Atget. The street teaches you to act quickly when you see something. If you don’t, you miss it!

– Joel Meyerowitz

Malaga, Spain, 1967 © Joel Meyerowitz

Malaga, Spain, 1967 © Joel Meyerowitz

Time Square, 1965 © Joel Meyerowitz

Time Square, 1965 © Joel Meyerowitz

Pool in Southwest, 1971 © Joel Meyerowitz

Pool in Southwest, 1971 © Joel Meyerowitz

Central Park, 1965 © Joel Meyerowitz

Central Park, 1965 © Joel Meyerowitz

Speaking of his mentor, Robert Frank:

He was a real loner. Sometimes when I ran into him he would send me away.

– Joel Meyerowitz

New York City, Times Square, 1963 © Joel Meyerowitz

New York City, Times Square, 1963 © Joel Meyerowitz

New York City, 1962 © Joel Meyerowitz

New York City, 1962 © Joel Meyerowitz

Christmas at Kennedy Airport, 1968 © Joel Meyerowitz

Christmas at Kennedy Airport, 1968 © Joel Meyerowitz


Ferdinando Scianna | Coney Island
NEW YORK CITY—Coney Island, 1985. © Ferdinando Scianna / Magnum Photos

NEW YORK CITY—Coney Island, 1985. © Ferdinando Scianna / Magnum Photos

A photograph is not created by a photographer. What [he/she does] is just open a little window and capture it. The world then writes itself on the film. The act of the photographer is closer to reading than it is to writing. They are the readers of the world.

– Ferdinando Scianna


Frank O’Hara | A Blade of Grass
Back Table at the Five Spot [David Smith(standing on left), Frank O'Hara (seated), Larry Rivers, and Grace Hartigan] © Burt Glinn, 1957

Back Table at the Five Spot [David Smith(standing on left), Frank O’Hara (seated), Larry Rivers, and Grace Hartigan] © Burt Glinn, 1957

One need never leave the confines of New York to get all the greenery one wishes—I can’t even enjoy a blade of grass unless I know there’s a subway handy, or a record store or some other sign that people do not totally regret life. It is more important to affirm the least sincere; the clouds get enough attention as it is and even they continue to pass.

– Frank O’Hara


Arnold Newman | W. Eugene Smith
W. Eugene Smith, 1977 © Arnold Newman

W. Eugene Smith, 1977 © Arnold Newman

The man who put it so beautifully was Eugene Smith who is a very dear friend of mine, probably the greatest photojournalist that ever lived. Cartier-Bresson is not a photojournalist. He takes individual images if you really look at them. When he came back from Japan, and he had a crowd of younger photographers around him at the ICP where they discussing his Minamata story, he began to realize as a lot of us did in that room, that they were thinking that if they only had access to a subject like Minamata, they too could become great photojournalists.

He realized this and what he said was, wait a minute. First, you have to be a good artist before you can be a good photojournalist.

And that is the essence of our art.

– Arnold Newman