Articles Tagged with: NASA
Stanley Kubrick | Barry Lyndon
Barry Lyndon, 1975

Barry Lyndon, 1975

He was obviously always a step ahead of me. He called me one, I remember I was at Warner’s, I think it was around the time he was getting ready to do Lyndon, and he said, ‘Do you have any of those special BNC cameras that we used for rear process?’ I said, ‘Why?’ He said, ‘For sentimental reasons. I started out on them. I’d love to buy one from you if I could get one.’ So I called the camera department and I said, ‘Do you have any of those?’ And they said, ‘We’ve got a couple of those.’ I called Stanley back….He said, ‘I’d love to get those cameras. I admire the workmanship.’ I said, ‘Great,’ and sent him one of those, or maybe two of them, I can’t remember.

About six months later, Gottschalk, who ran Panavision for us, and who was a certified camera and optical genius, called and said: ‘Why are you sending those rear-projection cameras to Stanley Kubrick?’ I said, ‘Because he asked for them. I mean, they sit down there, we don’t use rear-projection anymore. We’re doing front-projection.’ He said, ‘They’re priceless, they are the most fantastic works ever put into a camera. They are brilliantly conceived and brilliantly executed camera works. You could never build a camera like it if your life depended on it. I want to get everyone I can, because I can’t duplicate the work that went into them.’

Stanley had anticipated it and acquired them and built his own cameras!

– John Calley, Former President of Warner Bros., CEO of Sony Pictures

Barry Lyndon, 1975

Barry Lyndon, 1975

Barry Lyndon, 1975

Barry Lyndon, 1975

Barry Lyndon, 1975

Barry Lyndon, 1975

He looked for the old-fashioned Mitchell BNC cameras for a very specific reason. These were the only cameras, to his knowledge, where he had a chance of fitting these big Zeiss lenses.

– Jan Harlan, Executive Producer

Barry Lyndon, 1975

Barry Lyndon, 1975

Barry Lyndon, 1975

Barry Lyndon, 1975

Barry Lyndon, 1975

Barry Lyndon, 1975

And Stanley sent me this lens and said, could I mount it on his BNC camera? I said it’s absolutely impossible because the BNC has two shutters, a thick aperture plate, and all that between the film plane and the rear element of the lens. And so I explained that to Stanley and said we’d have to damn near wreck your camera and make it purely dedicated to do this. And he said, ‘Fine, go ahead and do it.’

It was originally a lens designed, developed, and manufactured by Zeiss for NASA. NASA was planning to use it in satellite photography. For that reason, it’s an extremely fast lens. It’s an f0.7 which is two stops faster than lenses that are even available today. Of course Stanely’s intention for these lenses was to shoot the famous candlelit scenes in Barry Lyndon. That being the case, he shot with the lenses wide open, f0.7. The consequence of that, he had practically no depth of field at all. It was quite a chore to do it, but of course the images were absolutely gorgeous.

– Ed Di Giulio, Cinematographer

Barry Lyndon, 1975

Barry Lyndon, 1975

Barry Lyndon, 1975

Barry Lyndon, 1975

Barry Lyndon, 1975

Barry Lyndon, 1975


NASA | Los Angeles Wildfires

Poor LA, burning again.

<i>The Station Fire</i>, mid-morning on Aug. 30

The Station Fire, mid-morning on Aug. 30

From the NASA website:

This image was acquired mid-morning on Aug. 30 by the backward (northward)-viewing camera of the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument on NASA’s Terra satellite. The image is shown in an approximate perspective view at an angle of 46 degrees off of vertical. The area covered by the image is 245 kilometers (152 miles) wide. Several pyrocumulus clouds, created by the Station Fire, are visible above the smoke plumes rising from the San Gabriel Mountains north of Los Angeles in the left-center of the image. Smoke from the Station fire is seen covering the interior valleys along the south side of the San Gabriel Mountains, along with parts of the City of Los Angeles and Orange County, and can be seen drifting for hundreds of kilometers to the east over the Mojave Desert.

Four years ago, I was shooting a wedding in Westlake Village, about an hour north of Los Angeles. The wedding was directly downwind from the raging Simi Valley fire at the time. It was like shooting during the apocalypse with the sky on fire, ash raining down and it was so dark even in the middle of the day, that I had to push all of my film. As a friend said when looking at the photo below,

Where was the reception? In Hell?

Heather & Chris, 2005; Simi Valley wildfire

Heather & Chris, 2005; Simi Valley wildfire; Nikon F5, 35-70mm, Fuji Pro NPZ © Doug Kim