Articles Tagged with: Mark Kurlansky
Mark Kurlansky | Woodcut Prints
Where Am I Going? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

Where Am I Going? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

In every age, people are certain that only the things they have deemed valuable have true value. The search for love and the search for wealth are always the two best stories. But while a love story is timeless, the story of a quest for wealth, given enough time, will always seem like the vain pursuit of a mirage.

– Mark Kurlansky, Salt

Who Is It? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

Who Is It? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

At times it sees that the search for good health has taken all the pleasure out of life. It has stripped us of butter, cream, marbled red meat, pork, and goose fat, not to mention alcohol and fine, hand-rolled cigars. And just when you settle on your favorite healthful fish, you’re told it’s laced with mercury. Sometimes it feels as though we would be better off being less healthy and enjoying life.

But then, miraculously, there is olive oil. Olive oil, it seems, is the only really good food we are still allowed.

– Mark Kurlansky from “Essential Oil,” Bon Appétit, November 2008

What Does She Want? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

What Does She Want? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

I always wanted to be a writer and I had in my head that a writer should either go to sea or go to war. There was a war available at the time but the sea was a much better idea. I did it for a couple of summers, to earn money for college.

My most memorable job was on a lobster boat. I was a pretty strong kid and they just needed someone who could haul pots on 200ft of line. We didn’t have a radio; sometimes you’d hear this roar, see a dark shadow and realise a freighter was bearing down on you. I never gave one thought to how dangerous it was. I absolutely loved it.

Many years later I was on a commercial fishing boat as a reporter and I wondered why the hell I’d liked it so much.

– Mark Kurlansky

Do I Make Any More Sense Than This Painting? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

Do I Make Any More Sense Than This Painting? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

While I write, I drink a lot of espresso. I have an espresso maker in my office. In one of my books, I gave an acknowledgment to caffeine.

– Mark Kurlansky


Daniel Webster | Party Chowder
Photograph by Anita Conti / Agence Vu / Aurora Photos

Photograph by Anita Conti / Agence Vu / Aurora Photos

Taken from Mark Kurlansky’s amazing book Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World.

Party Chowder

Take a cod of ten pounds, well cleaned, leaving on the skin. Cut into pieces one and a half pounds thick, preserving the head whole. Take one and a half pounds of clear, fat salt pork, cut into thin slices. Do the same with twelve potatoes. Take the largest pot you have. Try out the pork first, then take out the pieces of pork, leaving in the drippings. Add to that three parts of water, a layer of fish, so as to cover the bottom of the pot; next a layer of potatoes, then two tablespoons of salt, 1 teaspoon of peepper, then the pork, another layer of fish, and the remainder of the potatoes.

Fill the pot with water to cover the ingredients. Put over a good fire. Let the chowder boil twenty-five minutes. When this is done have a quart of boiling milk ready, and ten hard crackers split and dipped in cold water. Add milk and crackers. Let the whole boil five minutes. Then chowder is then ready to be first-rate if you have followed the directions. An onion may be aded if you like the flavor.

This chowder is suitable for a large fishing party.

– Daniel Webster, from The New England Yankee Cookbook, edited by Imogene Wolcott, 1939

Photo courtesy Provincial Archives of Newfoundland and Labrador

Photo courtesy Provincial Archives of Newfoundland and Labrador