Articles Tagged with: Film
Washington Square | August

I have been slacking on getting my film developed which means that I receive negs and proof sheets in batches, sometimes spanning a period of months, images and contact sheets containing forgotten narratives and distant days.

These shots are from August, during a fantastically hot stretch. The heat index hit 115 one day. I did not stop sweating until September.

Washington Square, New York © Doug Kim; Leica MP 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X

Washington Square, New York © Doug Kim; Leica MP 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X

Washington Square, New York © Doug Kim; Leica MP 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X

Washington Square, New York © Doug Kim; Leica MP 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X

Washington Square, New York © Doug Kim; Leica MP 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X

Washington Square, New York © Doug Kim; Leica MP 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X


Leica Sighting | The Anniversary Party
Jennifer Beals and an M4-2 and a 35mm Summilux-M ASPH in The Anniversary Party 2001

Jennifer Beals and an M4-2 and a 35mm Summilux-M ASPH in The Anniversary Party 2001

Jennifer Beals, John Benjamin Hickey, and an M4-2 and a 35mm Summilux-M ASPH in The Anniversary Party 2001

Jennifer Beals, John Benjamin Hickey, and an M4-2 and a 35mm Summilux-M ASPH in The Anniversary Party 2001

Jennifer Beals, Alan Cumming, Jennifer Jason Leigh, and an M4-2 and a 35mm Summilux-M ASPH in The Anniversary Party 2001

Jennifer Beals, Alan Cumming, Jennifer Jason Leigh, and an M4-2 and a 35mm Summilux-M ASPH in The Anniversary Party 2001

Information pulled from the great Leica FAQ site.

Jennifer Beals is an avid photographer and Leica shooter. Click here for more information about Jennifer Beals’ photography.


Philippe Halsman | Hitchcock, Truffaut

But the cinephile is … a neurotic! (That’s not a pejorative term.) The Bronte sisters were neurotic, and it’s because they were neurotic that they read all those books and became writers. The famous French advertising slogan that says, “When you love life, you go to the movies,” it’s false! It’s exactly the opposite: when you don’t love life, or when life doesn’t give you satisfaction, you go to the movies.

— François Truffaut

Blondes make the best victims. They’re like virgin snow that shows up the bloody footprints.

— Alfred Hitchcock

LOS ANGELES—French film director François Truffaut (left) and Hitchcock, 1962. © Philippe Halsman / Magnum Photos

LOS ANGELES—French film director François Truffaut (left) and Hitchcock, 1962. © Philippe Halsman / Magnum Photos


René Burri | Che Guevara

People think I became a millionaire with that photo – but I didn’t get a thing from everyone who used it on matches, T-shirts and wine bottles.

-René Burri

Ernesto “Che” Guevara, 1963 © René Burri / MAGNUM PHOTOS

Ernesto “Che” Guevara, 1963 © René Burri / MAGNUM PHOTOS

From an interview in the Guardian in 2010:

In 1958, a year before the revolution, Magnum wanted to send me to Cuba because they had contacts with the rebels. I’d just spent six months in South America and said no, so I missed everything.

Fortunately, a few years later, I got another phone call. Laura Bergquist, a star reporter with Look magazine, had met Che Guevara at the UN in October 1962, after the Cuban missile crisis. She bugged him so much that he told her: “If you get permission from the CIA or the Pentagon, you are invited to Cuba, and I will show you what is really going on.” She got the green light from the Americans – and I went with her.

We arrived at Che’s office on the eighth floor of the Hotel Riviera in Havana. At that time he was the number-two man in Cuba – he was the minister for industry, and director of the Banco Nacional. His face was on the two peso note. I saw the blinds were drawn and, after we were introduced, I asked him in French: “Che, can I open the blinds? I need some light.” But he said no. I thought, well, it’s your face, not mine.

Immediately, Bergquist and Che started a furious ideological dogfight. She had to take back a story for the Americans, who were still angry about the revolution, and he was trying to convince her that what happened had to happen. For two and a half hours I could just dance around them with my camera. It was an incredible opportunity to shoot Che in all kinds of situations: smiling, furious, from the back, from the front. I used up eight rolls of film. He didn’t look at me once, he was so engaged with trying to convince her with maps and graphs. She was a chain-smoker, and he occasionally lit up one of his cigars.

We went back to New York, and Look ran a 16- or 20-page story. This picture was only an eighth of a page. It certainly wasn’t a photo essay, like the one Henri Cartier-Bresson did for Life magazine at the same time. He was in town with us, but only got to shoot Che at a press conference.

After Che died in 1967, this picture took on a great deal of iconic significance. Even before then, some kids from Zurich approached me wanting to make a poster from it. I never heard whether Che liked it or not; there was no response from Cuba at all. A photograph is a moment – when you press the button, it will never come back. This picture is famous thanks to the chap with the cigar, not to me.

-René Burri

Contact sheet snippet of Ernesto “Che” Guevara, 1963 © René Burri / MAGNUM PHOTOS

Contact sheet snippet of Ernesto “Che” Guevara, 1963 © René Burri / MAGNUM PHOTOS


Garry Winogrand | Leica M4

Garry Winogrand’s last Leica M4:

Garry Winogrand's Leica M4

Garry Winogrand's Leica M4

Garry Winogrand's Leica M4

Garry Winogrand's Leica M4

From the source site:

I am told Mrs. Winogrand had very strong feelings that her husband’s camera should be continued to used after his death. She sold it to a family friend, who continues to shoot it to this day. Look at the front and back of the advance side top plate, where the chrome is worn away by the grip of Winogrand’s index and thumb. hmm. I get the impression he liked this camera, but he liked shooting pics even more.

More information and images can be here.


Margaret Herrick | Claudia Cardinale & Fellini, 8½

Having always loved the circus, I saw the resemblance between movies and the circus. As a boy, my greatest dream would have been to be the director of a circus. I love the fantasy and the sense of improvisation in both.

-Federico Fellini

Claudia Cardinale and Federico Fellini during the production of FEDERICO FELLINI'S 8 1/2, 1963.

Claudia Cardinale and Federico Fellini during the production of FEDERICO FELLINI'S 8 1/2, 1963.

When I arrived for my first movie, I couldn’t speak a word [of Italian]. I thought I was on the moon. I couldn’t understand what they were talking about. And I was speaking in French; in fact I was dubbed. And Federico Fellini was the first one who used my voice. I think I had a very strange voice.

-Claudia Cardinale


Jack London
Jack London © Getty Images

Jack London © Getty Images

You can’t wait for inspiration. You have to go after it with a club.

-Jack London


New Orleans | Decatur Street

Cafe Envie, Decatur St, New Orleans; Leica MP 0.58 TTL, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X 400 © Doug Kim

Cafe Envie, Decatur St, New Orleans; Leica MP 0.58 TTL, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X 400 © Doug Kim


Dobro, Decatur St, New Orleans; Leica MP 0.58 TTL, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X 400 © Doug Kim

Dobro, Decatur St, New Orleans; Leica MP 0.58 TTL, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X 400 © Doug Kim


Cooyon, Decatur St, New Orleans; Leica MP 0.58 TTL, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X 400 © Doug Kim

Cooyon, Decatur St, New Orleans; Leica MP 0.58 TTL, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X 400 © Doug Kim


Tailgaters, Decatur St, New Orleans; Leica MP 0.58 TTL, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X 400 © Doug Kim

Tailgaters, Decatur St, New Orleans; Leica MP 0.58 TTL, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X 400 © Doug Kim


Dennis Hopper, 1936 – 2010
Paul Newman, 1964 © Dennis Hopper

Paul Newman, 1964 © Dennis Hopper

I was a compulsive shooter back then. I was very shy, and it was a lot easier for me to communicate if I had a camera between me and other people.

-Dennis Hopper

Paris Woman, 1994 © Dennis Hopper

Paris Woman, 1994 © Dennis Hopper

I had been taking photographs because I hoped to be able to direct movies. That’s why I never cropped any of the photographs; they are all full-frame.

-Dennis Hopper

Jane Fonda, 1967 © Dennis Hopper

Jane Fonda, 1967 © Dennis Hopper

Like all artists I want to cheat death a little and contribute something to the next generation.

-Dennis Hopper

Bill Cosby (Chateau Marmont), 1965 © Dennis Hopper

Bill Cosby (Chateau Marmont), 1965 © Dennis Hopper

… but I was trying to go another way from the movie business. And I was taking pictures in black-and-white. Everyone else was using color. I was using Tri-X because I could shoot at night, and get shots by holding it real still, with just streetlights and so on. So these were things that I was playing with. But at the same time, a lot of my ideas were glamour ideas, because I wanted people to look good. So my portraits were about them in natural light, looking good, and looking in some way that had something to do with the reality of their world.

-Dennis Hopper

Jefferson Airplane, 1965 © Dennis Hopper

Jefferson Airplane, 1965 © Dennis Hopper

There are moments that I`ve had some real brilliance, you know. But I think they are moments. And sometimes, in a career, moments are enough. I never felt I played the great part. I never felt that I directed the great movie. And I can`t say that it`s anybody`s fault but my own.

-Dennis Hopper

Robert Rauschenberg, 1966 © Dennis Hopper

Robert Rauschenberg, 1966 © Dennis Hopper

You know, the history of California art doesn’t start until about 1961, and that’s when these photographs start. I mean, we have no history out here.

-Dennis Hopper

Brian Jones, 1965 © Dennis Hopper

Brian Jones, 1965 © Dennis Hopper

Most of the guys who were heavy on drugs and stuff — the rockers, and all that — we’re all out playing golf and we’re all sober. It is weird.

-Dennis Hopper

Tuesday Weld, 1965 © Dennis Hopper

Tuesday Weld, 1965 © Dennis Hopper

The high points have not been that many, but I’m a compulsive creator so I don’t think of the children first, I think of the work. Let’s see, I guess, Easy Rider, Blue Velvet, a couple of photographs here, a couple of paintings . . . those are the things that I would be proud of and yet they ’re so minimal in this vast body of crap — most of the 150 films I’ve been in — this river of shit that I’ve tried to make gold out of. Very honestly.

-Dennis Hopper

Jean Tinguely, 1963 © Dennis Hopper

Jean Tinguely, 1963 © Dennis Hopper

Then I had Easy Rider, and I couldn’t get another movie, so I lived in Mexico City for a couple of years. I lived in Paris for a couple of years. I didn’t take any photographs, and then I went to Japan and saw a Nikon used. I bought it, and I just started, like an alcoholic. I shot 300 rolls of film. That was the beginning of me starting again, and then I went digital.

-Dennis Hopper

Biker Couple, 1961 © Dennis Hopper

Biker Couple, 1961 © Dennis Hopper

I’d love to be in a Coen Brothers film, or something by Curtis Hanson — did you see 8 Mile? a terrific little movie — but I’ve never worked for Lucas or Spielberg. You could name most of the directors in Hollywood I’ve never worked for. I am not offered any of the roles that Jack Nicholson gets or Warren Beatty gets, or any of these people get, and never have been and never will. So when you ask me about playing villains and would I like to play other things, I think, God, I’m just lucky if I get a villain part every once in a while.

-Dennis Hopper

Biker, 1961 © Dennis Hopper

Biker, 1961 © Dennis Hopper

I think of that with my photographs. I think of them as ‘found’ paintings because I don’t crop them, I don’t manipulate them or anything. So they’re like ‘found’ objects to me.

-Dennis Hopper

Bruce Conner (in tub), Toni Basil, Teri Garr and Ann Marshall, 1964 © Dennis Hopper

Bruce Conner (in tub), Toni Basil, Teri Garr and Ann Marshall, 1964 © Dennis Hopper

When it first started, it was inferior and the inks weren’t archival. As soon as the inks became archival, I went digital. To me, it’s like the difference between developing something in chemical or being able to spray the light. It’s like painting with light, and the computer is reading the light. When a digital photograph looks right, it looks like it was painted.

-Dennis Hopper

Claes Oldenburg (Portrait with Cake Slices), 1965 © Dennis Hopper

Claes Oldenburg (Portrait with Cake Slices), 1965 © Dennis Hopper

I started out shooting flat, on walls, so that it had no depth of field, because I was being photographed all the time as an actor. And if you notice, there aren’t a lot of photographs [in the show] of actors — Dean Stockwell, Paul Newman. I thought I was an imposition to the actors who were being photographed all the time. I really wanted the flat-on-painter kind of surface. I did that for a long time. Then the artists. I really started taking photographs of artists. They wanted me to take photographs. They wanted posters and things. I was hanging out with them. I photographed the ones I thought were going to make it. I wasn’t really working as an actor during this period, and I thought, Well, if I’m not going to be able to work as an actor, I might as well be able make something that’s going to be credible. So I took photographs of Martin Luther King and Selma, Montgomery, as history, and selecting artists that I thought would make it. I met most of the Pop artists before they ever had shows.

-Dennis Hopper

Andy Warhol and members of the Factory (Gregory Markopoulos, Taylor Mead, Gerard Malanga & Jack Smith), 1963 © Dennis Hopper

Andy Warhol and members of the Factory (Gregory Markopoulos, Taylor Mead, Gerard Malanga & Jack Smith), 1963 © Dennis Hopper

I didn’t use a light meter; I just read the light off my hands. So the light varies, and there are some dark images. Also, I’m sort of a nervous person with the camera, so I will just shoot arbitrarily until I can focus and compose something, and then I make a shot. So generally, in those proof sheets, there are only three or four really concentrated efforts to take a photograph. It’s not like a professional kind of person who sets it up so every photograph looks really cool.

-Dennis Hopper

Ed Ruscha, 1964 © Dennis Hopper

Ed Ruscha, 1964 © Dennis Hopper

Well, I was a compulsive creator, so it became my creative outlet. I was using Tri-X film — which nobody else was using at the time — because I wanted to get as much natural light as possible and be able to shoot everything in natural light without flashes. I was a product of the movie business …

-Dennis Hopper

Irving Blum and Peggy Moffitt, 1964 © Dennis Hopper

Irving Blum and Peggy Moffitt, 1964 © Dennis Hopper

I was doing something that I thought could have some impact someday. In many ways, it’s really these photographs that kept me going creatively.

-Dennis Hopper

Self-portrait at porn stand, 1962, © Dennis Hopper

Self-portrait at porn stand, 1962, © Dennis Hopper

I am just a middle-class farm boy from Dodge City and my grandparents were wheat farmers. I thought painting, acting, directing and photography were all part of being an artist. I have made my money that way. And I have had some fun. It’s not been a bad life.

-Dennis Hopper