Articles Tagged with: Fashion
Ellen von Unwerth | Audrey Tautou

“Fabelhaft” with Audrey Tautou in German Vogue, April 2002.

Technique undoubtedly helps make photography magical, but I prefer to work with atmosphere. I think that the obsession with technique is a male thing. Boy’s toys. They love playing… but once you’ve perfected something you have to start searching for a new toy. I would rather search for a new model or location.

-Ellen von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth

Audrey Tautou in German Vogue by Ellen Von Unwerth


Bruce Weber | Summer Camp

I think that a lot of people, especially people who work for fashion magazines, feel that their photographs at times are really pretty much discarded or thrown away immediately because when you work for a magazine people today really don’t save magazines like they used to. I just think that as long as one can work and have a good time at it and at least learn something then you’re not discarding what you do. You go out and do a photograph. It should be all about getting onto another photograph.

-Bruce Weber

Featuring Daria Werbowy, Kate Moss, Lara Stone, Sasha Pivarova and styled by Alex White for the July 2008 issue of W Magazine.

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine

© Bruce Weber, W Magazine


Ellen von Unwerth | Evan Rachel Wood

Von Unwerth seems less of an auteur directing her subjects than a co-conspirator who intimately knows the inner lives of these girls who want to have fun.

-American Photo

Evan Rachel Wood in the Italian edition of Max magazine, Ellen Von Unwerth

Evan Rachel Wood in the Italian edition of Max magazine, Ellen Von Unwerth

I think that, because I know what it feels like to be in front of the camera, I can be more sympathetic to my subjects. Being in front of the lens, you are very vulnerable. It’s not a nice feeling, and I don’t miss it. But it’s very helpful to know exactly what it’s like. When I was a model I hated when I wasn’t allowed to move, so I love movement and I encourage my subjects to play around, to move and to be silly.

-Ellen Von Unwerth

Evan Rachel Wood in the Italian edition of Max magazine, Ellen Von Unwerth

Evan Rachel Wood in the Italian edition of Max magazine, Ellen Von Unwerth

When it is a good shoot , it is better then a party! Gorgeous girls, loud music and a bottle of Champagne, or two…

-Ellen Von Unwerth

Evan Rachel Wood in the Italian edition of Max magazine, Ellen Von Unwerth

Evan Rachel Wood in the Italian edition of Max magazine, Ellen Von Unwerth

I’m just trying to make beautiful pictures. I don’t see my works as exploitative. They’re just cheeky, they’re fun, and the models aren’t complaining.

-Ellen Von Unwerth

Evan Rachel Wood in the Italian edition of Max magazine, Ellen Von Unwerth

Evan Rachel Wood in the Italian edition of Max magazine, Ellen Von Unwerth

My favourite photographers are Helmut Newton and Jaques Henri Lartigue: one for the strength, sexuality and humour and the other one for the lightness and charm.

-Ellen Von Unwerth

Evan Rachel Wood in the Italian edition of Max magazine, Ellen Von Unwerth

Evan Rachel Wood in the Italian edition of Max magazine, Ellen Von Unwerth

My boyfriend 22 years ago gave me a camera and a crash course about how it works, and that is how I started. I did reportage pictures in Kenya and shot my model friends, after I made them up and dressed them with my clothes. I knew already how to print black and white photos, as we had a lab in our tiny apartment.

-Ellen Von Unwerth

Evan Rachel Wood in the Italian edition of Max magazine, Ellen Von Unwerth

Evan Rachel Wood in the Italian edition of Max magazine, Ellen Von Unwerth

I think that women open up more to a female photographer. It’s like little girls playing around. You can be a bit naughty and do things you wouldn’t do in front of boys. It’s more relaxed somehow. I think it’s an empowering experience – and no, I don’t believe they are objectified.

-Ellen Von Unwerth

Evan Rachel Wood in the Italian edition of Max magazine, Ellen Von Unwerth

Evan Rachel Wood in the Italian edition of Max magazine, Ellen Von Unwerth

William McFadden has compiled an invaluable archive of Ellen von Unwerth’s work here.


Ellen von Unwerth | Her Best Shot

From The Guardian:

I took this maybe three years ago, on a fashion shoot for Italian Vogue. We developed a romantic story to go with it: a woman comes back to the place where she grew up, and finds it all dusty and falling apart. We shot it in a chateau in Paris. The girl was a model, and it was the only time I worked with her. After this, she disappeared. She was from eastern Europe, Romania maybe, and even the agency could’t find her again. So she’s like a ghost. The picture certainly has a ghostly feeling.

I love a picture that surprises you: you try to get everything perfect, then somehow it ends up looking wrong. That’s why I love this one. It was taken with a Polaroid, one of those beautiful things that no longer exist. The light has caused the blurriness, giving the shot extra emotion. There’s something eerie about it, too: the girl’s expression is both vulnerable and strong.

I was a model for 10 years before becoming a photo-grapher. That certainly helps me now. I always felt bad in front of the camera, having to pose in particular ways – when all I wanted to do was something silly. So now I love it when models move, when they express themselves, when they play.

I love beautiful women. I love to show their personality, their sexuality. There’s a fashion side to my erotic pictures: I love beautiful shoes and jewellery. But the erotic work I do is too daring and provocative for a fashion magazine. It’s more fun, and if you have the right girl who likes it, more exciting, too. It’s fashion photography, but with fewer clothes.

-Ellen von Unwerth

'She disappeared after this' … from Fräulein, by Ellen von Unwerth

'She disappeared after this' … from Fräulein, by Ellen von Unwerth


Ellen von Unwerth | Ana Beatriz Barros

Happy Holidays!

Ana Beatriz Barros by Ellen von Unwerth

Ana Beatriz Barros by Ellen von Unwerth

Ana Beatriz Barros by Ellen von Unwerth

Ana Beatriz Barros by Ellen von Unwerth

Ana Beatriz Barros by Ellen von Unwerth

Ana Beatriz Barros by Ellen von Unwerth

Ana Beatriz Barros by Ellen von Unwerth

Ana Beatriz Barros by Ellen von Unwerth

Ana Beatriz Barros by Ellen von Unwerth

Ana Beatriz Barros by Ellen von Unwerth

Ana Beatriz Barros by Ellen von Unwerth

Ana Beatriz Barros by Ellen von Unwerth

Ana Beatriz Barros by Ellen von Unwerth

Ana Beatriz Barros by Ellen von Unwerth

Ana Beatriz Barros by Ellen von Unwerth

Ana Beatriz Barros by Ellen von Unwerth


Alhambra, CA | Fashion Show

I just found these in my archives, old scans from 2001 probably. I am not even sure what was going on, what I was shooting or why I was even there. But I have proof that something went on and I was there.

That is about it.

Chinese fashion show, Alhambra, CA © Doug Kim

Chinese fashion show, Alhambra, CA © Doug Kim

Chinese fashion show, Alhambra, CA © Doug Kim

Chinese fashion show, Alhambra, CA © Doug Kim

Chinese fashion show, Alhambra, CA © Doug Kim

Chinese fashion show, Alhambra, CA © Doug Kim

Chinese fashion show, Alhambra, CA © Doug Kim

Chinese fashion show, Alhambra, CA © Doug Kim


Helmut Newton | Taste in Women

The shrinking violet woman…that really gives me the creeps.

-Helmut Newton

Helmut Newton

Helmut Newton

Helmut Newton

Helmut Newton

Helmut Newton

Helmut Newton

Helmut Newton

Helmut Newton

Helmut Newton

Helmut Newton

He loves big women: statues, paintings, sculptures, live ones, especially live ones; because he can manipulate them…can control every muscle in their bodies.

-June Newton

Iman, Helmut Newton

Iman, Helmut Newton

Helmut Newton

Helmut Newton

I like girls who are just starting. They have not been formed, they have no routine, they have not been in front of the camera.

-Helmut Newton

Helmut Newton

Helmut Newton


Terry Richardson | Sisley “Farming” Campain 2001

I have friends that absolutely hate Terry Richardson and I have friends that own some of his prints

He has created such a unique, bizarre psychosexual world that what can be dangerous and unfortunate are the “porn chic” copycats like Dov Charney of American Apparel that seek to create their own Terry World. The legal actions by the models against Charney speak to the pitfalls of sexual participation by a photographer. Richardson seems to have successfully excised any predatory roles in his playground games.

My rule is that I’d never ask anyone to do anything I wouldn’t do myself…that’s how it’s got to go this far. At first, I’d just want to do a few nude shots, so I’d take off my clothes, too. I’d even give the camera to the model and get her to shoot me for a while. It’s about creating a vibe, getting people relaxed and excited. When that happens, you can do anything.

-Terry Richardson

This is the Sisley campaign series from 2001 which garnered massive awareness of Richardson in the mainstream, featuring Liliana Dominguez , Josie Maran, and others.

Gallery Notice : Images have either not been selected or couldn't be found

Porn kind of bums me out because there is so much sadness and pain in that world. So little joy or even pleasure. I don’t use porn or even go to strip clubs, like a lot of my friends. I don’t like to exploit anybody. That’s not my bag. Everyone has fun on my shoots.

-Terry Richardson


Helmut Newton | The Gunfighter Pose

You know, I loved always Gary Cooper as a gunfighter in High Noon. They are always ready to draw. They are always like this… Which means that the outline of the body, there is daylight behind them. When you have your hands there [on the body], you don’t see the outline of the body, the little waist, the big shoulders. So my models often stand exactly, or what I hope will be the gunfighter’s stance.

-Helmut Newton

Nadja Auermann by Helmut Newton

Nadja Auermann by Helmut Newton

Brigitte Nielsen by Helmut Newton

Brigitte Nielsen by Helmut Newton

Hugh Hefner's screening room by Helmut Newton

Hugh Hefner's screening room by Helmut Newton


Gordon Parks | Long Haired Furs

This series from Life Magazine in 1952 sums up just one of the many contradictions and facets that made up Gordon Parks. Filmmaker, poet, writer, photographer, movie producer, cinematographer, magazine publisher, novelist, activist, choreographer, semi-pro basketball player, and composer. And those are the accomplishments of his that I can list just off the top of my head.

He was an amazing man and perhaps his greatest work of art was his life itself. Read his works, watch his movies, read about his life, view his images. He was truly an iconoclast.

Someone once described him as the “elegant photojournalist.” This may be true, but it is also a sadly narrow and tiny taste of his expansive talents.

What is truly remarkable is how he could compartmentalize his talents. The eyes and the mind behind these images were also behind Shaft, The Learning Tree, “American Gothic” and “The Emerging Man”.

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Life Magazine, Gordon Parks, 1952

You know, the camera is not meant just to show misery.

-Gordon Parks

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Life Magazine, Gordon Parks, 1952

There’s another horizon out there, one more horizon that you have to make for yourself and let other people discover it, and someone else will take it further on, you know.

-Gordon Parks

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Life Magazine, Gordon Parks, 1952

I bought my first camera in Seattle, Washington. Only paid about seven dollars and fifty cents for it.

-Gordon Parks

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Life Magazine, Gordon Parks, 1952

I haven’t even learned how to spell Renaissance yet.

-Gordon Parks

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Life Magazine, Gordon Parks, 1952

But all I know, it was a constant effort, a constant feeling that I must not fail, and I still have that. And now, I feel at 85, I really feel that I’m just ready to start.

-Gordon Parks

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Life Magazine, Gordon Parks, 1952

In New York growing up, you never saw a black person on the street, you never saw a black person in the store, you never saw them in a restaurant. It just didn’t exist. So when Gordon and I met, it was really without any boundaries. First of all, he was drop-dead good-looking. We just looked into each other’s eyes, and we were friends.

-Gloria Vanderbilt

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Life Magazine, Gordon Parks, 1952

Many times I wondered whether my achievement was worth the loneliness I experienced, but now I realize the price was small.

-Gordon Parks