Dana Point | Parker & Scully

Posted: February 3rd, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: dougKIM photography, Film, Los Angeles

Park & Scully, Dana Point; Leica M6 TTL 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X © Doug Kim

Park & Scully, Dana Point; Leica M6 TTL 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X © Doug Kim


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Malibu | El Matador

Posted: February 1st, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: dougKIM photography, Film, Leica, Los Angeles

El Matador, Mailbu; Leica M6 TTL 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X © Doug Kim

El Matador, Mailbu; Leica M6 TTL 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X © Doug Kim

El Matador, Mailbu; Leica M6 TTL 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X © Doug Kim

El Matador, Mailbu; Leica M6 TTL 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X © Doug Kim


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Venice | Muscle Beach

Posted: September 20th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: dougKIM photography, Film, Los Angeles, Nikon

Going through the archives. Shot sometime in 2004. I think.

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Muscle Beach, Venice, California; Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim


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Clubracer | Fontana Raceway

Posted: August 15th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Clubracer, dougKIM photography, Film, Leica, Los Angeles

I always say that I see in black & white. Then non-photographers think that I mean that I am color blind. Or other photographers think that I am being a pretentious, arty B&W snob. I should instead say that I see in Black & White film.

It doesn’t always happen or the results are not always an exact match for what I thought I saw in the moment, but there are many moments where I can see exactly how the darkroom print will look.

This shot is a great example. I had been shooting this series of Clubracers in California and I entered the Pirelli truck and saw this moment. I metered quickly off the floor at the feet of this man to get the proper exposure of the floor, which I knew would make him a silhouette and would blow out the background. One frame.

When I got the proof sheet back, this tiny image popped. It was exactly as I envisioned it.

Doesn’t always happen, but it is a nice moment when it does.

Fontana, California; Leica M6 TTL 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim

Fontana, California; Leica M6 TTL 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Agfa APX 400 © Doug Kim


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Long Beach | Leica Nerd Meet Up

Posted: December 14th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: dougKIM photography, Leica, Los Angeles

Met up with the great Ben Clark and Ray Barbee in Long Beach last week for some falafel and Leica Nerding.

Music, food, friends and Leicas. It gets better than this, I’m sure, but yeah, it was a pretty good day.

Leica M6, Leica M7, Leica MP in Long Beach, CA; iPhone Instagram

Leica M6, Leica M7, Leica MP in Long Beach, CA; iPhone Instagram


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Hiroshi Watanabe | Places

Posted: June 21st, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Film, Los Angeles, New York City, Photography

El Arbolito Park, Quito, Ecuador, 2002 © Hiroshi Watanabe

El Arbolito Park, Quito, Ecuador, 2002 © Hiroshi Watanabe

I go to places that captivate and intrigue me. I am interested in what humans do. I seek to capture people, traditions, and locales that first and foremost are of personal interest. I immerse myself with information on the places prior to leaving, but I try to avoid firm, preconceived ideas. I strive for both calculation and discovery in my work, keeping my mind open for surprises. At times, I envision images I’d like to capture, but when I actually look through the viewfinder, my mind goes blank and I photograph whatever catches my eye. Photographs I return with are usually different from my original concepts. My photographs reflect both genuine interest in my subject as well as a respect for the element of serendipity, while other times I seek pure beauty. The pure enjoyment of this process drives and inspires me. I believe there’s a thread that connects all of my work — my personal vision of the world as a whole. I make every effort to be a faithful visual recorder of the world around me, a world in flux that, at very least in my mind, deserves preservation.

Artist’s statement, Hiroshi Watanabe

Music Notes, Nakatsugawa, Japan, 2004 © Hiroshi Watanabe

Music Notes, Nakatsugawa, Japan, 2004 © Hiroshi Watanabe

White Terns, Midway Atoll, 2000 © Hiroshi Watanabe

White Terns, Midway Atoll, 2000 © Hiroshi Watanabe

Whales Eye, Anaheim, CA, 2004 © Hiroshi Watanabe

Whales Eye, Anaheim, CA, 2004 © Hiroshi Watanabe

Bora Bora, Tahiti, 1997 © Hiroshi Watanabe

Bora Bora, Tahiti, 1997 © Hiroshi Watanabe

Mandalay, Burma, 2000 © Hiroshi Watanabe

Mandalay, Burma, 2000 © Hiroshi Watanabe

Santa Monica Pier, 2000 © Hiroshi Watanabe

Santa Monica Pier, 2000 © Hiroshi Watanabe

Battery Park, New York, 2000 © Hiroshi Watanabe

Battery Park, New York, 2000 © Hiroshi Watanabe

Liberty State Park, New Jersey, 2004 © Hiroshi Watanabe

Liberty State Park, New Jersey, 2004 © Hiroshi Watanabe

Tsutenkaku, Osaka, Japan, 2004 © Hiroshi Watanabe

Tsutenkaku, Osaka, Japan, 2004 © Hiroshi Watanabe

Salmon Heads, Sapporo, Japan, 2004 © Hiroshi Watanabe

Salmon Heads, Sapporo, Japan, 2004 © Hiroshi Watanabe

International Fountain, Seattle, 2000 © Hiroshi Watanabe

International Fountain, Seattle, 2000 © Hiroshi Watanabe

China Town, Portland, Oregon, 2004 © Hiroshi Watanabe

China Town, Portland, Oregon, 2004 © Hiroshi Watanabe

Standing Woman, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1997 © Hiroshi Watanabe

Standing Woman, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, 1997 © Hiroshi Watanabe

Kabukiza, Tokyo, Japan, 2004 © Hiroshi Watanabe

Kabukiza, Tokyo, Japan, 2004 © Hiroshi Watanabe


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Dennis Hopper, 1936 – 2010

Posted: May 31st, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Cinema, Film, Los Angeles, Nikon, Photography, Quotes

Paul Newman, 1964 © Dennis Hopper

Paul Newman, 1964 © Dennis Hopper

I was a compulsive shooter back then. I was very shy, and it was a lot easier for me to communicate if I had a camera between me and other people.

-Dennis Hopper

Paris Woman, 1994 © Dennis Hopper

Paris Woman, 1994 © Dennis Hopper

I had been taking photographs because I hoped to be able to direct movies. That’s why I never cropped any of the photographs; they are all full-frame.

-Dennis Hopper

Jane Fonda, 1967 © Dennis Hopper

Jane Fonda, 1967 © Dennis Hopper

Like all artists I want to cheat death a little and contribute something to the next generation.

-Dennis Hopper

Bill Cosby (Chateau Marmont), 1965 © Dennis Hopper

Bill Cosby (Chateau Marmont), 1965 © Dennis Hopper

… but I was trying to go another way from the movie business. And I was taking pictures in black-and-white. Everyone else was using color. I was using Tri-X because I could shoot at night, and get shots by holding it real still, with just streetlights and so on. So these were things that I was playing with. But at the same time, a lot of my ideas were glamour ideas, because I wanted people to look good. So my portraits were about them in natural light, looking good, and looking in some way that had something to do with the reality of their world.

-Dennis Hopper

Jefferson Airplane, 1965 © Dennis Hopper

Jefferson Airplane, 1965 © Dennis Hopper

There are moments that I`ve had some real brilliance, you know. But I think they are moments. And sometimes, in a career, moments are enough. I never felt I played the great part. I never felt that I directed the great movie. And I can`t say that it`s anybody`s fault but my own.

-Dennis Hopper

Robert Rauschenberg, 1966 © Dennis Hopper

Robert Rauschenberg, 1966 © Dennis Hopper

You know, the history of California art doesn’t start until about 1961, and that’s when these photographs start. I mean, we have no history out here.

-Dennis Hopper

Brian Jones, 1965 © Dennis Hopper

Brian Jones, 1965 © Dennis Hopper

Most of the guys who were heavy on drugs and stuff — the rockers, and all that — we’re all out playing golf and we’re all sober. It is weird.

-Dennis Hopper

Tuesday Weld, 1965 © Dennis Hopper

Tuesday Weld, 1965 © Dennis Hopper

The high points have not been that many, but I’m a compulsive creator so I don’t think of the children first, I think of the work. Let’s see, I guess, Easy Rider, Blue Velvet, a couple of photographs here, a couple of paintings . . . those are the things that I would be proud of and yet they ’re so minimal in this vast body of crap — most of the 150 films I’ve been in — this river of shit that I’ve tried to make gold out of. Very honestly.

-Dennis Hopper

Jean Tinguely, 1963 © Dennis Hopper

Jean Tinguely, 1963 © Dennis Hopper

Then I had Easy Rider, and I couldn’t get another movie, so I lived in Mexico City for a couple of years. I lived in Paris for a couple of years. I didn’t take any photographs, and then I went to Japan and saw a Nikon used. I bought it, and I just started, like an alcoholic. I shot 300 rolls of film. That was the beginning of me starting again, and then I went digital.

-Dennis Hopper

Biker Couple, 1961 © Dennis Hopper

Biker Couple, 1961 © Dennis Hopper

I’d love to be in a Coen Brothers film, or something by Curtis Hanson — did you see 8 Mile? a terrific little movie — but I’ve never worked for Lucas or Spielberg. You could name most of the directors in Hollywood I’ve never worked for. I am not offered any of the roles that Jack Nicholson gets or Warren Beatty gets, or any of these people get, and never have been and never will. So when you ask me about playing villains and would I like to play other things, I think, God, I’m just lucky if I get a villain part every once in a while.

-Dennis Hopper

Biker, 1961 © Dennis Hopper

Biker, 1961 © Dennis Hopper

I think of that with my photographs. I think of them as ‘found’ paintings because I don’t crop them, I don’t manipulate them or anything. So they’re like ‘found’ objects to me.

-Dennis Hopper

Bruce Conner (in tub), Toni Basil, Teri Garr and Ann Marshall, 1964 © Dennis Hopper

Bruce Conner (in tub), Toni Basil, Teri Garr and Ann Marshall, 1964 © Dennis Hopper

When it first started, it was inferior and the inks weren’t archival. As soon as the inks became archival, I went digital. To me, it’s like the difference between developing something in chemical or being able to spray the light. It’s like painting with light, and the computer is reading the light. When a digital photograph looks right, it looks like it was painted.

-Dennis Hopper

Claes Oldenburg (Portrait with Cake Slices), 1965 © Dennis Hopper

Claes Oldenburg (Portrait with Cake Slices), 1965 © Dennis Hopper

I started out shooting flat, on walls, so that it had no depth of field, because I was being photographed all the time as an actor. And if you notice, there aren’t a lot of photographs [in the show] of actors — Dean Stockwell, Paul Newman. I thought I was an imposition to the actors who were being photographed all the time. I really wanted the flat-on-painter kind of surface. I did that for a long time. Then the artists. I really started taking photographs of artists. They wanted me to take photographs. They wanted posters and things. I was hanging out with them. I photographed the ones I thought were going to make it. I wasn’t really working as an actor during this period, and I thought, Well, if I’m not going to be able to work as an actor, I might as well be able make something that’s going to be credible. So I took photographs of Martin Luther King and Selma, Montgomery, as history, and selecting artists that I thought would make it. I met most of the Pop artists before they ever had shows.

-Dennis Hopper

Andy Warhol and members of the Factory (Gregory Markopoulos, Taylor Mead, Gerard Malanga & Jack Smith), 1963 © Dennis Hopper

Andy Warhol and members of the Factory (Gregory Markopoulos, Taylor Mead, Gerard Malanga & Jack Smith), 1963 © Dennis Hopper

I didn’t use a light meter; I just read the light off my hands. So the light varies, and there are some dark images. Also, I’m sort of a nervous person with the camera, so I will just shoot arbitrarily until I can focus and compose something, and then I make a shot. So generally, in those proof sheets, there are only three or four really concentrated efforts to take a photograph. It’s not like a professional kind of person who sets it up so every photograph looks really cool.

-Dennis Hopper

Ed Ruscha, 1964 © Dennis Hopper

Ed Ruscha, 1964 © Dennis Hopper

Well, I was a compulsive creator, so it became my creative outlet. I was using Tri-X film — which nobody else was using at the time — because I wanted to get as much natural light as possible and be able to shoot everything in natural light without flashes. I was a product of the movie business …

-Dennis Hopper

Irving Blum and Peggy Moffitt, 1964 © Dennis Hopper

Irving Blum and Peggy Moffitt, 1964 © Dennis Hopper

I was doing something that I thought could have some impact someday. In many ways, it’s really these photographs that kept me going creatively.

-Dennis Hopper

Self-portrait at porn stand, 1962, © Dennis Hopper

Self-portrait at porn stand, 1962, © Dennis Hopper

I am just a middle-class farm boy from Dodge City and my grandparents were wheat farmers. I thought painting, acting, directing and photography were all part of being an artist. I have made my money that way. And I have had some fun. It’s not been a bad life.

-Dennis Hopper


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San Simeon | Ragged Point

Posted: March 5th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: dougKIM photography, Nikon

Nikon D300, 80-200mm Nikkor.

Ragged Point © Doug Kim

Ragged Point © Doug Kim


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