Robert Doisneau & André Kertész

Posted: December 27th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Film, Photography, Quotes

Les Amoureux aux Poireaux, 1950 © Robert Doisneau

Les Amoureux aux Poireaux, 1950 © Robert Doisneau

A hundredth of a second here, a hundredth of a second there–even if you put them end to end, they still only add up to one, two, perhaps three seconds, snatched from eternity.

-Doisneau Robert

Lovers, Budapest, 1915 © André Kertész

Lovers, Budapest, 1915 © André Kertész

Everything is a subject. Every subject has a rhythm. To feel it is the raison d’être. The photograph is a fixed moment of such a raison d’être, which lives on in itself.

-André Kertész

Robert Doisneau and André Kertész in Arles, France, 1975 © Wolfgang H. Wögerer

Robert Doisneau and André Kertész in Arles, France, 1975 © Wolfgang H. Wögerer


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André Kertesz | Form & Composition

Posted: June 5th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Film, New York City, Poetry

Mondrian’s Glasses and Pipe, Paris, 1926 © Estate of André Kertész

Mondrian’s Glasses and Pipe, Paris, 1926 © Estate of André Kertész

André Kertész has two qualities that are essential for a great photographer : an insatiable curiosity about the world, about people, and about life, and a precise sense of form.

-Brassai

Arm with Fan, New York, 1937 © André Kertész

Arm with Fan, New York, 1937 © André Kertész

Martinique, 1972 © André Kertész

Martinique, 1972 © André Kertész

The Heron, 1969 © André Kertész

The Heron, 1969 © André Kertész

The moment always dictates in my work….Everybody can look, but they don’t necessarily see….I see a situation and I know that it’s right.

-André Kertész

Disappearing Act, 1955 © André Kertész

Disappearing Act, 1955 © André Kertész


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André Kertész | The Place de la Concorde , Paris, 1928

Posted: May 21st, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Books, Film, Photography, Quotes

The Place de la Concorde

The Place de la Concorde

Look at the atmosphere, the reflection. Why did I do it this way? Instinct. I have no other explanation. The subject offered itself to me and I took advantage.

-Andrés Kertész, Kertész on Kertész


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André Kertész | Rooster, New York, 1952

Posted: May 15th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Books, Film, New York City, Photography, Quotes

André Kertész | <i>Rooster, New York, 1952</i>

André Kertész | Rooster, New York, 1952

Here is a picture I took the first day I moved in — a rainy day full of atmosphere.

-André Kertész, Kertész on Kertész


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André Kertész | The Blind Violinist, Abony, Hungary, 1921

Posted: March 20th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Film, Photography

André Kertész | <i>The Blind Violinist, Abony, Hungary, 1921</i>

André Kertész | The Blind Violinist, Abony, Hungary, 1921

The blind musician. Look at the expression on his face. It was absolutely fantastic. If he had been born in Berlin, London or Paris, he might have become a first-rate musician.

-André Kertész, Kertész on Kertész


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André Kertész | Landing Pigeon, New York, 1960

Posted: March 4th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Books, Film, New York City, Photography, Quotes

André Kertész | <i>Landing Pigeon</i>

André Kertész | Landing Pigeon, New York, 1960

This was taken around 59th Street where they had demolished the houses, and I saw a pigeon flying in and out. The original idea for this photograph dates back to my days in Paris, where I also saw some old run-down houses and wanted to photograph them with a pigeon. But the pigeon never came. Here in New York I sat and waited. Time and time again I went back to the same place, but it was never right. Then one day I saw the lonely pigeon. I took maybe two or three pictures. The moment was here. I had waited maybe thirty years for that instant.

-André Kertész, Kertész on Kertész


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Cartier-Bresson, Kertész & Koudelka

Posted: February 24th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Film, Photography, Quotes

Once, Henri [Cartier-Bresson] rang me in Paris and said, ‘Josef, [André] Kertész is in town, you must come to dinner and meet him.’ I said, ‘Henri, I love his pictures but I do not need to meet him.’ ‘No, you do not understand, you have to meet him because we three, we are of the same family.’ At the time, this seems to me to be an unbelievable thing to say. Now, though, when I look back from a distance, I can see that maybe there is something in that.

-Josef Koudelka

Stairs of Montmartre, Paris 1925, André Kertész

Stairs of Montmartre, Paris 1925, André Kertész

PRAGUE, Czechoslovakia—1992. © Josef Koudelka / Magnum Photos

PRAGUE, Czechoslovakia—1992. © Josef Koudelka / Magnum Photos


Hyères, France, 1932 © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

Hyères, France, 1932 © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos


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André Kertész | New York City, 1979

Posted: February 17th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Film, New York City, Photography, Quotes

André Kertész | <i>New York City, 1979</i>

André Kertész | New York City, 1979

Everything that surrounds you can give you something. Last summer I stayed in my room most of the time and I began playing around with things. Years ago I was given a little primitive Polaroid camera and I didn’t like it–it was for snapshots. But one day I took it out. I had discovered, in the window of a shop, a little glass bust, and I was very moved because it resembled my wife–the shoulder and the neck were Elizabeth. For months and months I looked at the bust in the window and I finally bought it. The lady in the shop said, ‘It’s a beautiful bust, sir.’ ‘I know,’ I said. And I took it home, put it in my window, and began shooting and shooting with the Polaroid camera–in the morning, in the afternoon, in different lights. Something came out of this little incident, this little object. They made a book of all the pictures I took. It is dedicated to my wife. Look how the face of the bust is always changing: a shadow, which is the shadow of the curtain, then a passing cloud.

The sky and its reflection give it the expression. I didn’t arrange this thing–it was “there”. Photography cannot make nature more beautiful. Nature is the most beautiful thing in the world. You can show the beauty, illustrate it, but it is never the real beauty–very far from it. We don’t know how beautiful nature really is. We can only guess. I am always saying the best photographs are those I never took.

-André Kertész, Kertész on Kertész


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André Kertész | Satyric Dancer, Paris, 1926

Posted: January 17th, 2010 | Author: | Filed under: Books, Film, Photography, Quotes

André Kertész | <i>Satyric Dancer, Paris, 1926</i>

André Kertész | Satyric Dancer, Paris, 1926

This picture of Magda was also taken in Beöthy’s studio. I said to her, ‘Do something with the spirit of the studio corner,’ and she started to move on the sofa. She just made a movement. I took only two photographs. No need to shoot a hundred rolls like people do today. People in motion are wonderful to photograph. It means catching the right moment–the moment when something changes into something else. It shows a kind of distortion similar to that in the photograph of the swimmer.

-André Kertész, Kertész on Kertész


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André Kertész | Washington Square, New York, 1954

Posted: December 27th, 2009 | Author: | Filed under: Books, Film, New York City, Photography, Quotes

André Kertész | <i>Washington Square, New York, 1954</i>

André Kertész | Washington Square, New York, 1954

My wife and I found the apartment, which I still live in [Kertész passed away in 1985], in 1952. I take many pictures from my balcony. It looks down onto Washington Square.

-André Kertész, Kertész on Kertész


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