Category: Quotes
André Kertész | Satyric Dancer, Paris, 1926
André Kertész | <i>Satyric Dancer, Paris, 1926</i>

André Kertész | Satyric Dancer, Paris, 1926

This picture of Magda was also taken in Beöthy’s studio. I said to her, ‘Do something with the spirit of the studio corner,’ and she started to move on the sofa. She just made a movement. I took only two photographs. No need to shoot a hundred rolls like people do today. People in motion are wonderful to photograph. It means catching the right moment–the moment when something changes into something else. It shows a kind of distortion similar to that in the photograph of the swimmer.

-André Kertész, Kertész on Kertész


Dennis Stock | 1928 – 2010

Bronx-born Dennis Stock passed away this Tuesday at the age of 81. Shooting for Magnum Photos for over 50 years, his body of work is most notable for his images of jazz greats and Hollywood celebrities, especially his iconic images of James Dean taken just prior to his death in 1955. One of my favorite series of his are the images on the set of “The Planet of The Apes” movie. I will search for more of those images and post them soon.

James Dean in Times Square, 1955 © Dennis Stock

James Dean in Times Square, 1955 © Dennis Stock

A very famous photograph of James Dean taken in Times Square in 1955. He is walking in the rain, cigarette dangling from his lips, the beauty of 1950’s New York in varying shades of black and grey — foggy, misty and utterly compelling — in short a perfect picture… perfect composition, perfect subject, perfect era, perfect mood.

-Gail Levin, filmmaker

John Updike, Massachusetts, 1962 © Dennis Stock / Magnum

John Updike, Massachusetts, 1962 © Dennis Stock / Magnum

Art is a well-articulated manifestation of an aspect of life. I have been privileged to view much of life through my cameras, making the journey an enlightened experience. My emphasis has mainly been on affirmative reactions to human behavior and a strong attraction to the beauty in nature.

– Dennis Stock

New York City, 1959 © Dennis Stock / Magnum Photos

New York City, 1959 © Dennis Stock / Magnum Photos

Cafe de Flore © Dennis Stock

Cafe de Flore © Dennis Stock

I’ve never taken an assignment. I’ve always photographed what I wanted to be photographing, and then worried about selling the pictures or doing something with them afterwards. I’ve always shot for myself, and when you’re shooting what you’re interested in shooting, you’re always going to be happy.

– Dennis Stock

NEW YORK CITY—Audrey Hepburn during the filming of Sabrina by Billy Wilder, 1954. © Dennis Stock / Magnum Photos

NEW YORK CITY—Audrey Hepburn during the filming of Sabrina by Billy Wilder, 1954. © Dennis Stock / Magnum Photos

UNITED STATES—Marilyn Monroe watching the filming of Desirée, 1953. © Dennis Stock / Magnum Photos

UNITED STATES—Marilyn Monroe watching the filming of Desirée, 1953. © Dennis Stock / Magnum Photos

PHILADELPHIA—Louis Armstrong during the last minute of concentration in the wings before appearing in public, 1958. © Dennis Stock / Magnum Photos

PHILADELPHIA—Louis Armstrong during the last minute of concentration in the wings before appearing in public, 1958. © Dennis Stock / Magnum Photos

Miles Davis, Birdland, New York City, 1958. © Dennis Stock / Magnum Photos

Miles Davis, Birdland, New York City, 1958. © Dennis Stock / Magnum Photos

FAIRMOUNT, Ind.—James Dean on the farm of his uncle Marcus Winslow, posing with a pig and asking himself, "Do I belong to the animals, to the pigs, the cattle, or the goats?" 1955. © Dennis Stock / Magnum Photos

FAIRMOUNT, Ind.—James Dean on the farm of his uncle Marcus Winslow, posing with a pig and asking himself, "Do I belong to the animals, to the pigs, the cattle, or the goats?" 1955. © Dennis Stock / Magnum Photos

CALIFORNIA—A surfer at Corona del Mar, 1968. © Dennis Stock / Magnum Photos

CALIFORNIA—A surfer at Corona del Mar, 1968. © Dennis Stock / Magnum Photos

Discovery, which is the heartbeat of good photography, occurs more readily when the photographer relinquishes self-consciousness for a state of humility and childlike wonderment. Then there is a greater freshness and purity in what you capture on film.

-Dennis Stock

LOS ANGELES—Playa del Rey, 1968. © Dennis Stock / Magnum Photos

LOS ANGELES—Playa del Rey, 1968. © Dennis Stock / Magnum Photos


Henri Cartier-Bresson | America, Part One

Since his is fundamentally a tragic vision, he reacted most feelingly to what in America he saw as related to its decay, its pain.

-Arthur Miller, writing of the photographs that Cartier-Bresson took in America.

CHICAGO—The employment office, 1947.

CHICAGO—The employment office, 1947.

NEW ORLEANS—1947. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

NEW ORLEANS—1947. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

NEW YORK CITY—On the Lower East Side, 1947. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

NEW YORK CITY—On the Lower East Side, 1947. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

NEW YORK CITY—1947. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

NEW YORK CITY—1947. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

CAPE COD, Mass.—Independence Day, 1947. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

CAPE COD, Mass.—Independence Day, 1947. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

CAPE COD, Mass.—“This woman explained to me that the flagpole over her door was broken, but ‘on such a day as this, one keeps one’s flag on one’s heart.’ I felt in her a touch of the strength and robustness of the early American pioneers.”—Henri Cartier-Bresson, Independence Day, 1947. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

CAPE COD, Mass.—“This woman explained to me that the flagpole over her door was broken, but ‘on such a day as this, one keeps one’s flag on one’s heart.’ I felt in her a touch of the strength and robustness of the early American pioneers.”—Henri Cartier-Bresson, Independence Day, 1947. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

MASSACHUSETTS—Watching fireworks on July 4, 1947. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

MASSACHUSETTS—Watching fireworks on July 4, 1947. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

NEW YORK—Coney Island, 1946. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

NEW YORK—Coney Island, 1946. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

LOS ANGELES—1960. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

LOS ANGELES—1960. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

NEW MEXICO—At the Lama Foundation community, a father and two children pass in front of the kitchen, a stoutly built octagonal wood and glass structure (geodesic dome) with all the things a kitchen should have, plus a dining room above, 1971. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

NEW MEXICO—At the Lama Foundation community, a father and two children pass in front of the kitchen, a stoutly built octagonal wood and glass structure (geodesic dome) with all the things a kitchen should have, plus a dining room above, 1971. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

NEW YORK CITY—Easter Sunday in Harlem, 1947. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

NEW YORK CITY—Easter Sunday in Harlem, 1947. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

KNOXVILLE, Tenn.—1947. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

KNOXVILLE, Tenn.—1947. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

WASHINGTON, D.C.—At the Lincoln Memorial, a Pilgrimage for Freedom prayer session features singer Mahalia Jackson, 1957. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

WASHINGTON, D.C.—At the Lincoln Memorial, a Pilgrimage for Freedom prayer session features singer Mahalia Jackson, 1957. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

MICHIGAN—Football at Ann Arbor University, 1960.  © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

MICHIGAN—Football at Ann Arbor University, 1960. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

ANN ARBOR, Mich.—A Michigan vs. Northwestern football game, Oct. 15, 1960. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

ANN ARBOR, Mich.—A Michigan vs. Northwestern football game, Oct. 15, 1960. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

NEW YORK CITY—1959. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

NEW YORK CITY—1959. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

New York, 1947, Henri Cartier-Bresson © Magnum Photos

New York, 1947, Henri Cartier-Bresson © Magnum Photos


Robert Frank | Los Angeles

To live for two months in LA is like being hospitalized.

-Robert Frank, February 27, 1956; from a letter to Walker Evans, while Frank was applying for a continuance of his Guggenheim grant.

Los Angeles, 1956, Robert Frank

Los Angeles, 1956, Robert Frank

Los Angeles, 1956, Robert Frank

Los Angeles, 1956, Robert Frank

Los Angeles, 1956 © Robert Frank

Los Angeles, 1956, Robert Frank

St. Francis, Gas Station and City Hall – Los Angeles, 1956, Robert Frank

St. Francis, Gas Station and City Hall – Los Angeles, 1956, Robert Frank

Ranch market, Hollywood, California, Robert Frank

Ranch market, Hollywood, California, Robert Frank

Motorama, Los Angeles, California, Robert Frank

Motorama, Los Angeles, California, Robert Frank


Henri Cartier-Bresson | Ezra Pound
Ezra Pound, Venice 1971 © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

VENICE—Ezra Pound, 1971 Henri Cartier-Bresson © Magnum Photos

Martine Franck, Cartier-Bresson’s widow, accompanied her husband to just one — probably atypical — portrait session, that of the poet Ezra Pound in Venice in 1971, a year before his death at 87.

There was a tremendous, heavy silence,’ recalled Ms. Franck, herself a photographer. ‘Pound didn’t say a word. He just seemed to condemn the world with his eyes. We were there for about 20 minutes. I stayed to one side. I huddled in a corner. Henri took seven pictures.’

– From This Decisive Moment On by Alan Riding in The New York Times, January 26, 2006


Daido Moriyama | Shinjuku

One of my favorite single series is Daido Moriyama’s book of wanderings in the Shinjuku neighborhood of Tokyo. Viewing his fractured, scattered, shattered images is to embark on a journey as a furtive outsider, stalking the streets, seeking prey in alleys, noodle shops and sex bars.

Shinjuku, Daido Moriyama

Shinjuku, Daido Moriyama

As long as I can walk, I will continue wandering the streets.

-Daido Moriyama

Shinjiku, Daido Moriyama

Shinjuku, Daido Moriyama

I want to express the realness of Japan. I want to show what is really going on.

-Daido Moriyama

Shinjuku, Daido Moriyama

Shinjuku, Daido Moriyama

I’m not always a stray dog. Sometimes I’m a cat or an insect.

-Daido Moriyama

Shinjuku, Daido Moriyama

The cover of the limited signed edition of Shinjuku, Daido Moriyama

The streets are my territory and I still wander them aimlessly with my camera.

-Daido Moriyama


Henri Cartier-Bresson | Random Images from the Magnum Archives

Magnum Photos has been releasing some images online from their singular historic archives which is an incredible opportunity to study and learn from the masters in their catalog. These images by Henri Cartier-Bresson, some of which have not been widely published, provide a rich insight into his style and process.

BERLIN—Taxi drivers, 1931, Henri Cartier-Bresson © Magnum Photos

BERLIN—Taxi drivers, 1931, Henri Cartier-Bresson © Magnum Photos

I am in awe of him, I am in absolute awe of him. Everyone is a Cartier-Bresson baby…I worship him.

-Richard Avedon.

PARIS—Bofinger restaurant, 1969. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

PARIS—Bofinger restaurant, 1969. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

Nothing worth knowing can be taught.

-Henri Cartier-Bresson

ACAPULCO, Mexico—A market, 1963. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

ACAPULCO, Mexico—A market, 1963. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

You mustn’t want, you must be receptive. Don’t think even. The brain’s a bit dangerous.

-Henri Cartier-Bresson

PARIS—Café Flore, 1959. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

PARIS—Café Flore, 1959. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

I don’t consider myself a photographer, I am using a camera, but there are millions of photographers….I’m just a human being. Anyone that is sensitive is an artist.

-Henri Cartier-Bresson

NEW YORK CITY—A football game at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, 1947. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

NEW YORK CITY—A football game at Yankee Stadium in the Bronx, 1947. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

Photography is nothing–it’s life that interests me.

– Henri Cartier-Bresson

NEW YORK CITY—Downtown, 1947. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

NEW YORK CITY—Downtown, 1947. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

They . . . asked me:

‘How do you make your pictures?’ I was puzzled . . .

I said, ‘I don’t know, it’s not important.’

-Henri Cartier-Bresson

VILLAGE OF BRANGUES, France—French writer and diplomat Paul Claudel, 1945. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

VILLAGE OF BRANGUES, France—French writer and diplomat Paul Claudel, 1945. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

In a portrait, I’m looking for the silence in somebody.

-Henri Cartier-Bresson

AHMEDABAD, GUJARAT, India—The Rangwala retail and wholesale cloth market, 1966. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

AHMEDABAD, GUJARAT, India—The Rangwala retail and wholesale cloth market, 1966. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

Actually, I’m not all that interested in the subject of photography. Once the picture is in the box, I’m not all that interested in what happens next. Hunters, after all, aren’t cooks.

-Henri Cartier-Bresson

NAPLES, Italy—1960. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

NAPLES, Italy—1960. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

And no photographs taken with the aid of flash light, either, if only out of respect for the actual light – even when there isn’t any of it.

-Henri Cartier-Bresson – “The Decisive Moment”

ELEUSIS, Greece—1953. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

ELEUSIS, Greece—1953. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

There is no closed figure in nature. Every shape participates with another. No one thing is independent of another, and one thing rhymes with another, and light gives them shape.

-Henri Cartier-Bresson


André Kertész | Broken Plate, Paris, 1929
André Kertész | <i>Broken Plate, Paris, 1929</i>

André Kertész | Broken Plate, Paris, 1929

In this picture of Montmartre, I was just testing a new lens for a special effect. When I went to America, I left most of my material in Paris, and when I returned I found sixty percent of the glass-plate negatives were broken. This one I saved, but it had a hole in it. I printed it anyways. And accident helped me to produce a beautiful effect.

-André Kertész, Kertész on Kertész