David Baiely | Michael Caine, 1965

Posted: January 31st, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Painting, Photography, Quotes

Michael Caine, 1965 © David Baiely

Michael Caine, 1965 © David Baiely

It takes a lot of imagination to be a good photographer. You need less imagination to be a painter because you can invent things. But in photography everything is so ordinary; it takes a lot of looking before you learn to see the extraordinary.

- David Bailey


Tags: , , , | No Comments »





Désirée Dolron | Xteriors VII, 2004

Posted: January 29th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Painting, Photography

Xteriors VII, 2004 © Désirée Dolron

Xteriors VII, 2004 © Désirée Dolron

 

The astounding Dutch photographer Désirée Dolron’s work can be viewed here. This piece sold recently for £103,250.

I enjoy reading about people online trying to mimic her style using Photoshop only. Poor digital generation photographers. Good bye craftsmanship.


Tags: , , , , | No Comments »





Budapest | Kovach Gergo

Posted: December 13th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Budapest, dougKIM photography, Film, Painting

Kovach Gergo, District XI, Budapest, Hungary; Leica MP 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X © Doug Kim

Kovach Gergo, District XI, Budapest, Hungary; Leica MP 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X © Doug Kim

Kovach Gergo, District XI, Budapest, Hungary; Leica MP 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X © Doug Kim

Kovach Gergo, District XI, Budapest, Hungary; Leica MP 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X © Doug Kim


Tags: , , , , , , , , | No Comments »





Arnold Newman | Portraits

Posted: November 4th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Architecture, Cinema, Film, Los Angeles, New York City, Painting, Photography, Quotes

Roy Lichtenstein, 1976 © Arnold Newman

Roy Lichtenstein, 1976 © Arnold Newman

If it’s a good photograph and says something about the person, than I think it’s a good portrait.

- Arnold Newman

Piet Mondrian, 1942 © Arnold Newman

Piet Mondrian, 1942 © Arnold Newman

I wasn’t mimicking it (Mondrian’s style), I was echoing it. I did it deliberately and when he saw the results, he loved it. He gave me the original drawings of Broadway Boogie-Woogie. It was the only thing he could give me. I was stunned at the time.

The thing is I was trying to say with my photographs what Mondrian meant to me. That I would copy his work or anybody else’s in order to do it to me would be horrifying because I would be copying and not creating. A lot of people do that. The man by the way is stiff, linear and very formal, just like his own work.

- Arnold Newman

Truman Capote, 1977 © Arnold Newman

Truman Capote, 1977 © Arnold Newman

Ayn Rand, 1964 © Arnold Newman

Ayn Rand, 1964 © Arnold Newman

Ava Gardner, 1949 © Arnold Newman

Ava Gardner, 1949 © Arnold Newman

Movie stars, actors…all they have is themselves. They have no other ability but to go on and portray somebody else. They don’t know how to be themselves. And it becomes a very difficult thing. Very rarely a great artist, not rarely, but only a few of them can say I don’t really care, I have warts, photograph me with the warts.

- Arnold Newman

Carl Sandburg and Marilyn Monroe, 1962 © Arnold Newman

Carl Sandburg and Marilyn Monroe, 1962 © Arnold Newman

I was acquainted with Carl at that time. He was working on the west coast, working on the words of Jesus in the Greatest Story Ever Told. He said come on out, let’s start work. I stayed with a friend of mine, a producer on a film, Something’s Got To Give. And that was of course the film that Marilyn didn’t finish.

I never saw the glamorous creature. Oh, I saw flashes of her in public and all that. But in the privacy of the home and wherever we were at, and later at my home, I saw nothing but a sad, sick girl.

- Arnold Newman

Leonard Bernstein, 1968 © Arnold Newman

Leonard Bernstein, 1968 © Arnold Newman

Max Ernst, 1942 © Arnold Newman

Max Ernst, 1942 © Arnold Newman

You wait for things to happen. Let’s say, I think I would like to photograph you over here, how about you standing behind the desk for a moment for me, and they’ll do that. Now, let’s face it, if you’ve got a very irritable subject or a man who is pretty rough and tough, President Johnson specifically, why don’t you just stand there for a few minutes, you just can’t do that. As a matter of fact, he gave me fifteen minutes, of course I took forty five. The idea was was that I was loosening him up, to get him used to the idea of photographing. I had to take a risk, my first risk shots, my insurance pictures at the beginning. They were not bad, but they were stiff and he was uptight, looking at his watch mentally.

Later, I got him to relax, we were kidding, he leaned sort of like this as he was waiting for me to get my camera ready again, which before he was very upset that I wasn’t ready. I was doing this on purpose. Finally, when he was like this, I said, don’t move.

- Arnold Newman

Alfred Krupp, 1963 © Arnold Newman

Alfred Krupp, 1963 © Arnold Newman

The worst people in the world, the real villains of today very often as Hitchcock said, hide in broad daylight, you just don’t recognize them. That’s the way Krupp was. He looked like a nice distinguished gentlemanly human being and he looked at my pictures and said, “Mr. Newman, I love your photographs so I think maybe we should take photographs.”

I worked this out where I got the lights to come under him, the usual thing. The result was that when I got him there, it was working but not really working. I had built a little platform of about two meters high, long enough to accommodate the both of us, him straddling a chair. I didn’t want to over do it. The lights were working beautifully but it just didn’t give me what I wanted. I went to Herr Bolen, that was his family name, “would you lean forward” and he leaned this way and my hair stood on end. There was the devil.

And they declared me persona non grata in Germany.

- Arnold Newman

Arthur Miller, 1947 © Arnold Newman

Arthur Miller, 1947 © Arnold Newman

John F. Kennedy © Arnold Newman

John F. Kennedy © Arnold Newman

Portraiture is a term that has taken on all these barnacles, all these terrible things that have happened to portraiture, on canvas, on stone, on metal, and then in photography. It’s something that is done to please the subject. A photographer is nothing more than a whore who does nothing but sit there thinking, will it please the subject, will i be able to sell him this picture, or will I be able to please him so he will buy it.

And the result is that little by little, people have begun to look down at portraiture, forgetting that the greatest artists in the world from Rembrandt, to Holbein, on up to Stieglitz and Strand, what have you, have all done portraiture and loved it. I happen to particularly love photographing people.

- Arnold Newman

Bill Clinton © Arnold Newman

Bill Clinton © Arnold Newman

Ansel Adams, 1975 © Arnold Newman

Ansel Adams, 1975 © Arnold Newman

Man Ray, 1948 © Arnold Newman

Man Ray, 1948 © Arnold Newman

Well, I didn’t mean to make a series of photographs on artists. My intent was explicitly to experiment with portraiture. And I hate the word portraiture. I prefer to call it photographs of people.

When I came to New York, you have to understand, in 1938, things were still bad from the depression and there wasn’t much money. I was unknown. I had this desire to make photographs of people but I didn’t know anyone. The ones that I wanted to meet, the ones that seemed to me, gave me the greatest opportunity…the artists were absolutely perfect.

- Arnold Newman

Salvador Dali, 1951 © Arnold Newman

Salvador Dali, 1951 © Arnold Newman

Henri Cartier-Bresson, NYC, 1947 © Arnold Newman

Henri Cartier-Bresson, NYC, 1947 © Arnold Newman

Cartier-Bresson is not a photojournalist. He takes individual images if you really look at them.

- Arnold Newman

Marc Chagall, 1942 © Arnold Newman

Marc Chagall, 1942 © Arnold Newman

Course Stieglitz was a man who I greatly admired and I had no idea that I was going to meet him. I do remember the fact that kept using words like inventive but the word that he kept using was honesty. He kept urging me then and later to be honest.

- Arnold Newman

Jean Dubuffet, 1956 © Arnold Newman

Jean Dubuffet, 1956 © Arnold Newman

Frank Lloyd Wright, 1947 © Arnold Newman

Frank Lloyd Wright, 1947 © Arnold Newman

Great photographs are not made with a camera. They are made by a human being with a mind. And he uses a tool. If that tool cannot make a great work of art, then he discards the tool. As long as the tools are available to us to make something that satisfies us, we’ll use it, no matter how imperfect it is.

- Arnold Newman

I.M. Pei, 1967 © Arnold Newman

I.M. Pei, 1967 © Arnold Newman

Claes Oldenburg, 1967 © Arnold Newman

Claes Oldenburg, 1967 © Arnold Newman

Igor Stravinsky, 1946 © Arnold Newman

Igor Stravinsky, 1946 © Arnold Newman

It all came to head in just a moment. I had been going to concerts and looking at various instruments. I had already photographed musical instruments in part and in whole and that sort of thing. Suddenly I realized that I had been admiring the shape of the piano and suddenly it hit me The piano shape – strong, hard, sharp, linear, beautiful in this strong harsh way was really the echo of Stravinsky’s work, his own music. When I thought about that, reflected on that, I thought where can I get a piano?

We found an editor who had a piano with a very simple wall, very simple background. I was able to manipulate the light on the background by simply taking one 1,000 watt light and moving it around until I got the exact light I wanted.

- Arnold Newman

Marcel Duchamp, 1966 © Arnold Newman

Marcel Duchamp, 1966 © Arnold Newman

Jean Arp, 1949 © Arnold Newman

Jean Arp, 1949 © Arnold Newman

Isamu Noguchi, 1947 © Arnold Newman

Isamu Noguchi, 1947 © Arnold Newman

Pablo Picasso, 1954 © Arnold Newman

Pablo Picasso, 1954 © Arnold Newman

[For the Picasso image] I used a small portion of a 4×5 negative which was part of a series that I did. I love the whole photograph, I still think that that is a successful photograph. What I realized in examining the photograph, the most exciting thing was face and his eyes so I decided to blow up that little section and make that the full image. And I blew it up and it was so successful, the old story, less is more. The impact of that closely cropped head with those fantastic eyes increased the value of the picture instead of decreasing it and it probably became one of my best known photographs.

- Arnold Newman

Louise Nevelson, 1972 © Arnold Newman

Louise Nevelson, 1972 © Arnold Newman


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 4 Comments »





Neil Libbert | Francis Bacon

Posted: November 2nd, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Film, Painting, Photography

Francis Bacon, December 14, 1984 © Neil Libbert

Francis Bacon, December 14, 1984 © Neil Libbert

The French House in Soho was the location for this impromptu shot of Francis Bacon. Libbert had called in for a lunchtime pint and found the pub empty apart from the painter, who drank there regularly. There was no film in Libbert’s camera so he loaded it surreptitiously and then secretly took two shots. Bacon was so deep in thought he did not notice him. Libbert never intended the picture to be published but it eventually appeared in the Observer some years later alongside the artist’s obituary

- The Guardian


Tags: , , , , , , | No Comments »





André Kertész | Chagall Family, Paris, 1933

Posted: August 18th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Books, Film, Painting, Photography, Quotes

Chagall Family, Paris, 1933 © André Kertész

Chagall Family, Paris, 1933 © André Kertész

Everything is a subject. Every subject has a rhythm. To feel it is the raison d’être. The photograph is a fixed moment of such a raison d’être, which lives on in itself.

- Andre Kertesz

If I create from the heart, nearly everything works; if from the head, almost nothing.

- Marc Chagall


Tags: , , , , , , | No Comments »





Mark Kurlansky | Woodcut Prints

Posted: January 19th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Books, History, Painting, Quotes

Where Am I Going? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

Where Am I Going? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

In every age, people are certain that only the things they have deemed valuable have true value. The search for love and the search for wealth are always the two best stories. But while a love story is timeless, the story of a quest for wealth, given enough time, will always seem like the vain pursuit of a mirage.

- Mark Kurlansky, Salt

Who Is It? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

Who Is It? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

At times it sees that the search for good health has taken all the pleasure out of life. It has stripped us of butter, cream, marbled red meat, pork, and goose fat, not to mention alcohol and fine, hand-rolled cigars. And just when you settle on your favorite healthful fish, you’re told it’s laced with mercury. Sometimes it feels as though we would be better off being less healthy and enjoying life.

But then, miraculously, there is olive oil. Olive oil, it seems, is the only really good food we are still allowed.

- Mark Kurlansky from “Essential Oil,” Bon Appétit, November 2008

What Does She Want? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

What Does She Want? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

I always wanted to be a writer and I had in my head that a writer should either go to sea or go to war. There was a war available at the time but the sea was a much better idea. I did it for a couple of summers, to earn money for college.

My most memorable job was on a lobster boat. I was a pretty strong kid and they just needed someone who could haul pots on 200ft of line. We didn’t have a radio; sometimes you’d hear this roar, see a dark shadow and realise a freighter was bearing down on you. I never gave one thought to how dangerous it was. I absolutely loved it.

Many years later I was on a commercial fishing boat as a reporter and I wondered why the hell I’d liked it so much.

- Mark Kurlansky

Do I Make Any More Sense Than This Painting? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

Do I Make Any More Sense Than This Painting? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

While I write, I drink a lot of espresso. I have an espresso maker in my office. In one of my books, I gave an acknowledgment to caffeine.

- Mark Kurlansky


Tags: , , , , | No Comments »





Robert Doisneau | 1912 – 1994

Posted: January 13th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Film, Painting, Photography, Quotes

La poule en laisse © Robert Doisneau

La poule en laisse © Robert Doisneau

Danse © Robert Doisneau

Danse © Robert Doisneau

When I was photographing fashion for Vogue, against a white background, I was only acting a part. Watching a fashion show never gave me any particular emotion, never made me think : “I must absolutely photograph that woman, in that dress”. Besides, models weren’t as friendly as they are now, they always seemed to look down on the little man at the other side of the camera, who was only trying to get his photo.

- Robert Doisneau

 

Le ruban de la mariée, 1951 © Robert Doisneau

Le ruban de la mariée, 1951 © Robert Doisneau

Les animaux superieurs, 1954 © Robert Doisneau

Les animaux superieurs, 1954 © Robert Doisneau

I’ve made every possible mistake. Because I don’t like to obey orders and I always question what I’m told. So I have to try out everything for myself, and that has lead me into many dead ends.

- Robert Doisneau

 

Les frères, rue du Docteur Lecène, Paris 1934 © Robert Doisneau

Les frères, rue du Docteur Lecène, Paris 1934 © Robert Doisneau

Yes, the expectation of a miracle. It’s very childish, but at the same time it’s almost like an act of faith. We find a backdrop and wait for the miracle. I remember a backdrop that never worked for me, possibly because I didn’t wait long enough, or didn’t return to it often enough. In the foreground you can see the steps of Saint Paul’s church, the background is a perfect faubourg, as you imagine them from literature or movies. I frame it in my viewfinder, from rue de Turenne to a shop called Le Gant d’Or, and wait there for an hour, sometimes two, thinking, “my God, something is bound to happen”. I imagine events I would like to photograph, one wilder than the other. But nothing happens, nothing. Or if it does – bang – it’s so different from what I expected that I miss it. The miracle did take place, but I wasted it, because I didn’t pay the right kind of attention. When you are tired, you become unable to react, your emotion is no longer available.

- Robert Doisneau

 

Bois Bouloigne ©  Robert Doisneau

Bois Bouloigne © Robert Doisneau

Plenty. I couldn’t count all my hours of mad hope, while expecting the miracle to happen. Hardly a week goes by without at least one day of photography. But sometimes I have the feeling that I’m hounded by a curse. It took me five years to get sacked by Renault – though I had done all I could to that purpose – and three months later war was declared and my freedom was lost again. Now, that I don’t have to waste my time with advertising photos, or with complying to the demands of magazines, my wife’s illness has fallen on me. For the last ten years, this has detained me from using my time as I wanted. It’s like a fatality. Still, I believe that constraint, and the feeling of exasperation that comes with it, can also become a stimulus to create.

- Robert Doisneau

 

Concours du plus beau tatouage 1950 © Robert Doisneau

Concours du plus beau tatouage 1950 © Robert Doisneau

The advantage we have, compared to painters and writers, is that we never lose contact with the rough side of life. It is a lesson in humility and it keeps us from some pitfalls. But above all it nourishes us. Other people’s vitality nourishes us, without their knowledge. It has done me good to work on this project in Saint-Denis, to find myself in the streets again, face to face with people. Though I must say that I found them less friendly than twenty years ago, possibly because of today’s photographers, who hold their cameras like weapons – so of course the rabbit on the other side doesn’t feel too good. I wouldn’t dare shoot as they do, I don’t have William Klein’s nerve. Sometimes the camera pulls me along, but once I’ve got my photo I wonder, “How am I going to cope with this now, how can I explain it to these people?”

- Robert Doisneau

 

Mademoiselle Anita 1951 © Robert Doisneau

Mademoiselle Anita 1951 © Robert Doisneau

Paris © Robert Doisneau

Paris © Robert Doisneau

[Using a Rollei] You ended up bowing before the subject, as if in prayer. Whereas with a 35mm camera, you put him straight in your line of fire – that is in your line of sight, so as to shoot right into his face. And if you aren’t quick enough, this may annoy him and he will agress you. I understand it now, as more and more often people tend to photograph me, it’s like the attractiveness of old ruins, you become picturesque without wanting to. So I realise what it feels to have such a machine pointed at you : if you stick your finger up your nose – click – your fellow photographer won’t miss it.

- Robert Doisneau

 

Trépidante Wanda 1953 © Robert Doisneau

Trépidante Wanda 1953 © Robert Doisneau

Sunday morning in Arcueil 1945 © Robert Doisneau

Sunday morning in Arcueil 1945 © Robert Doisneau

A memory from my youth comes back to me. You go into the woods on a bike, with a girl. There is the smell of heather, you can hear the wind in the fir trees, you don’t dare tell her about your love, but you feel happy, as if you were floating above the ground. Then you look at the clouds beyond the trees and they are fleeting. And you know that within an hour you’ll have to go home, that tomorrow will be a working day. You wish you could stop that moment for ever, but you can’t, it is bound to end. So you take a photo, as if to challenge time. Maybe the girl will move to another town and you will never see her again, or you will see her changed, tired, humiliated by her everyday life, working as a salesgirl in some shop, with a boss always shouting at her. To me, this desire to preserve the moment seems justified, in spite of that German priest mentioned by Gisèle Freund, who pretends that the photographic image is a sacrilege.

- Robert Doisneau

 

Paris © Robert Doisneau

Paris © Robert Doisneau

I had a few problems with the law. It appears that people have rights about their own image, and this often prevents me from catching their spontaneity. So I must stop them and say, “I noticed you while passing by, would you mind kissing again?” That’s what happened with the “Hôtel de Ville lovers”, they re-enacted their kiss. Those with the grocer were a couple I hired.

- Robert Doisneau

 

Le Baiser de l'Hôtel de Ville 1950 © Robert Doisneau

Le Baiser de l'Hôtel de Ville 1950 © Robert Doisneau

The “Hôtel de Ville lovers” were part of a series, on which I had already worked for a week and which I had to complete with two or three photos of that kind. But the fact that they were set up never bothered me. After all, nothing is more subjective than l’objectif (the French word for “lens”), we never show things as they “really”are. The world I was trying to present was one where I would feel good, where people would be friendly, where I could find the tenderness I longed for. My photos were like a proof that such a world could exist.

- Robert Doisneau

 

Créatures de Rêves, 1952 © Robert Doisneau

Créatures de Rêves, 1952 © Robert Doisneau

L'enfant Papillon 1945 © Robert Doisneau

L'enfant Papillon 1945 © Robert Doisneau

Les écoliers de la rue Damesme, Paris 1956 © Robert Doisneau

Les écoliers de la rue Damesme, Paris 1956 © Robert Doisneau

My photographs show the world as I would like it to be.

- Robert Doisneau

 

Montbéliard © Robert Doisneau

Montbéliard © Robert Doisneau

Picasso et Françoise Gilot, 1952 © Robert Doisneau

Picasso et Françoise Gilot, 1952 © Robert Doisneau

Les Enfants de la Place Herbert, 1957 © Robert Doisneau

Les Enfants de la Place Herbert, 1957 © Robert Doisneau

We must always remember that a picture is also made up of the person who looks at it. This is very, very important. Maybe this is the reason behind those pictures that haunt me and that haunt many people as well. It is about that walk that one takes with the picture when experiencing it. I think that this is what counts. One must let the viewer extricate himself, free himself for the journey. You offer the seed and then the viewer grows it inside himself. For a long time I thought that I had to give the entire story to my audience. I was wrong.

- Robert Doisneau

 

Georges Braque a Varengeville Normandy, 1953 © Robert Doisneau

Georges Braque a Varengeville Normandy, 1953 © Robert Doisneau

La dent, Paris 1956 © Robert Doisneau

La dent, Paris 1956 © Robert Doisneau

Le cadran scolaire, Paris 1956 © Robert Doisneau

Le cadran scolaire, Paris 1956 © Robert Doisneau

I’m not sure that total freedom is such a good thing. When you have to rely on yourself for living, you accept all kinds of assignments. But you cannot help glancing to the right or to the left, as if playing some game with the working hours that you owe your employer – and in the end the photos worth preserving are the ones you stole from his time.

- Robert Doisneau

 

La voiture fondue,1944 © Robert Doisneau

La voiture fondue,1944 © Robert Doisneau

Georges Braque a Varangeville, 1953 © Robert Doisneau

Georges Braque a Varangeville, 1953 © Robert Doisneau

La poterne des peupliers,1932 © Robert Doisneau

La poterne des peupliers,1932 © Robert Doisneau

The world I was trying to present was one where I would feel good, where people would be friendly, where I could find the tenderness I longed for. My photos were like a proof that such a world could exist.

- Robert Doisneau

 

Fernand Leger dans ses oeuvres © Robert Doisneau

Fernand Leger dans ses oeuvres © Robert Doisneau


Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 3 Comments »





Sante D’Orazio | A Private View

Posted: November 7th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Film, Painting, Photography

What happened to Sante?

13 years ago when his book A Private View came out, he was the shit, at the top of his game and the industry, gracing the covers of all the major magazines, shooting choice editorials with the top celebrities and models at the time.

I rarely see his name these days and the editorials I do see feature second-tier subjects. His work used to be so playful, sensual and light. There was a warmth in his portraits and a lushness in his black & white work. Some of the recent work that I’ve seen is flat and cold, and very anonymous.

Regardless, his book A Private View is a shooting diary of his work with some personal notes, outtakes, and lists of films shot. It is a book full of charm and beauty.

Kate Moss © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Kate Moss © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Kate Moss © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Kate Moss © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Kate Moss © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Kate Moss © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Christy Turlington © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Christy Turlington © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Christy Turlington © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Christy Turlington © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Christy Turlington © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Christy Turlington © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Julian Schnabel © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Julian Schnabel © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Julian Schnabel © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Julian Schnabel © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Carla Bruni © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View

Carla Bruni © Sante D'Orazio, A Private View


Tags: , , , , , , , , , | No Comments »





Robert Doisneau | Retrospective

Posted: September 7th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Film, Painting, Quotes

A selection of images from the Robert Doisneau Retrospective at the Château de Malbrouck in 2011.

La Pause, Mine de Giraumont Meurthe et Moselle, 1960 © Atelier Robert Doisneau courtesy of GAMMA-RAPHO

La Pause, Mine de Giraumont Meurthe et Moselle, 1960 © Atelier Robert Doisneau courtesy of GAMMA-RAPHO

The photographer must be absorbent–like a blotter, allow himself to be permeated by the poetic moment…. His technique should be like an animal function…he should act automatically.

-Robert Doisneau

Baiser Blotto, 1950 © Atelier Robert Doisneau courtesy of GAMMA-RAPHO Agency

Baiser Blotto, 1950 © Atelier Robert Doisneau courtesy of GAMMA-RAPHO Agency

The marvels of daily life are exciting; no movie director can arrange the unexpected that you find in the street.

-Robert Doisneau

Be Bop en cave, Saint-Germain-des-prés, 1951 © Atelier Robert Doisneau courtesy of GAMMA-RAPHO Agency

Be Bop en cave, Saint-Germain-des-prés, 1951 © Atelier Robert Doisneau courtesy of GAMMA-RAPHO Agency

Chance is the one thing you can’t buy. You have to pay for it and you have to pay for it with your life, spending a lot of time, you pay for it with time, not the wasting of time but the spending of time.

-Robert Doisneau

Drapé de Grès, Paris, 1955 © Atelier Robert Doisneau courtesy of GAMMA-RAPHO Agency

Drapé de Grès, Paris, 1955 © Atelier Robert Doisneau courtesy of GAMMA-RAPHO Agency

If I knew how to take a good photograph, I’d do it every time.

-Robert Doisneau

Jacques Prevert au gueridon, 1955 © Atelier Robert Doisneau courtesy of GAMMA-RAPHO Agency

Jacques Prevert au gueridon, 1955 © Atelier Robert Doisneau courtesy of GAMMA-RAPHO Agency

I like people for their weaknesses and faults. I get on well with ordinary people. We talk. We start with the weather, and little by little we get to the important things. When I photograph them it is not as if I were examining them with a magnifying class, like a cold and scientific observer. It’s very brotherly. And it’s better, isn’t it, to shed some light on those people who are never in the limelight.

-Robert Doisneau

Le baiser de l'hôtel de ville, 1950 © Atelier Robert Doisneau courtesy of GAMMA-RAPHO Agency

Le baiser de l'hôtel de ville, 1950 © Atelier Robert Doisneau courtesy of GAMMA-RAPHO Agency

You’ve got to struggle against the pollution of intelligence in order to become an animal with very sharp instincts – a sort of intuitive medium – so that to photograph becomes a magical act, and slowly other more suggestive images begin to appear behind the visible image, for which the photographer cannot be held responsible.

-Robert Doisneau

Les pains de Picasso, Vallauris, 1952 © Atelier Robert Doisneau courtesy of GAMMA-RAPHO Agency

Les pains de Picasso, Vallauris, 1952 © Atelier Robert Doisneau courtesy of GAMMA-RAPHO Agency

If you take photographs, don’t speak, don’t write, don’t analyse yourself, and don’t answer any questions.

-Robert Doisneau

Tir à l'oxygène liquide. Transport des cartouches, Mine de Murville, Meurthe et Moselle, 1960 © Atelier Robert Doisneau courtesy of GAMMA-RAPHO Agency

Tir à l'oxygène liquide. Transport des cartouches, Mine de Murville, Meurthe et Moselle, 1960 © Atelier Robert Doisneau courtesy of GAMMA-RAPHO Agency

A hundredth of a second here, a hundredth of a second there — even if you put them end to end, they still only add up to one, two, perhaps three seconds, snatched from eternity.

-Robert Doisneau


Tags: , , , | No Comments »