Category: Cinema
Leica Sighting | Blood Diamond

In the movie “Blood Diamond”, Jennifer Connelly portrays a journalist and occasionally breaks out her black M6 Classic and a 35 Summicron to take photos. Annoyingly, the sound editors dubbed in the sound of an SLR firing instead of the sound of a Leica click.

Yes, I am a geek.

Jennifer Connelly and her M6 Classic, 35 Summicron in Blood Diamond

Jennifer Connelly and her M6 Classic, 35 Summicron in "Blood Diamond"

Jennifer Connelly and her M6 Classic, 35 Summicron in Blood Diamond

Jennifer Connelly and her M6 Classic, 35 Summicron in "Blood Diamond"


Ireland | Cong

Being a huge fan of John Ford’s “The Quiet Man” since I was a kid, I could not wait to visit the village of Cong in County Mayo where they filmed much of the movie. The tiny village is dominated by tourist traps for fans of the film but off the main strip, things settle down and the quaintness of life in western Ireland takes over.

Drive about an hour north of Galway on Route 334 on the Circular Road and just enjoy the scenery.

Shot with a Nikon F5, 35-70mm Nikkor, and Kodak Tri-X 400.

Cong, County Mayo, Ireland © Doug Kim

Cong, County Mayo, Ireland © Doug Kim

Cong, County Mayo, Ireland © Doug Kim

Cong, County Mayo, Ireland © Doug Kim

Cong, County Mayo, Ireland © Doug Kim

Cong, County Mayo, Ireland © Doug Kim


Anouk Aimée | 8 ½

Anouk Aimée was so stunningly beautiful that when Fellini cast her as the long-suffering Luisa in , he famously cut her long eyelashes, added freckles, and clothed her in unglamorous, de-sexualized costumes.

I do not think it worked.

Anouk Aimée, <i>8½</i>, 1963

Anouk Aimée, , 1963

Anouk Aimée, 8½, 1963

Anouk Aimée, , 1963

Anouk Aimée, 8½, 1963

Anouk Aimée, , 1963

Anouk Aimée, 8½, 1963

Anouk Aimée, , 1963

Anouk Aimée, 8½, 1963

Anouk Aimée, , 1963

Anouk Aimée, 8½, 1963

Anouk Aimée, , 1963


Hollywood Forever Cemetery | Cinespia

One of the great treasures of Los Angeles is the Hollywood Forever Cemetery and its summer film series Cinespia.

Yes, it sounds creepy, like the opening scene of a zombie movie. Everyone assumes that you will have to walk over graves in the dark, lean against headstones to watch the movies as your friends slowly disappear in the night, one by one. This is not the case at all. There is a great lawn near one of the buildings where you can spread your blankets and pillows and picnic under those perfect summer nights in Los Angeles.

The selection of flicks is eclectic, alternating between classics and cult movies. Beware of the really popular films because the line at the entrance and parking will be horrendous. Each night features a guest DJ before and after the movie and it is a great festive evening. Go grab your wine and pesto pasta and throw pillows and get in line. You will not be disappointed.

Cinespia, Hollywood Forever Cemetary, Leica M6, Kodak Tri-X

Cinespia, Hollywood Forever Cemetary, Leica M6, Kodak Tri-X

Cinespia, Hollywood Forever Cemetary, Leica M6, Kodak Tri-X

Cinespia, Hollywood Forever Cemetary, Leica M6, Kodak Tri-X

Hollywood Forever is also well worth checking out in the daytime as many celebrities reside within its fences and there are many tragic stories to be stumbled upon and discovered.

Hollywood Forever Cemetary, Leica M6, Kodak Tri-X

Hollywood Forever Cemetary, Leica M6, Kodak Tri-X

These dolls were arranged in the hedges next to a series of children’s graves.

Hollywood Forever Cemetary, Leica M6, Kodak Tri-X

Hollywood Forever Cemetary, Leica M6, Kodak Tri-X

Hollywood Forever Cemetary, Leica M6, Kodak Tri-X

Hollywood Forever Cemetary, Leica M6, Kodak Tri-X

Johnny Ramone, Hollywood Forever Cemetary, Leica M6, Kodak Tri-X

Johnny Ramone, Hollywood Forever Cemetary, Leica M6, Kodak Tri-X

I do not know if this is still the case as I have not been there in a couple of years, but near Johnny Ramone’s statue, a gang of extremely territorial ducks and geese reside in the reflecting pond. Since there are no other graves or markers nearby, they really appear to be Johnny’s guardians and they are mean fuckers. In this image, you can see that they waddled all the way over from the water just to come chase me off.

And yes, they did chase me off. Fuckers.

There are two quotes on the side of the statue:

Please come back.

-love, Vincent Gallo

As good a friend as there ever was.

-John Frusciante


Giant Robot | Tokyo Gore Police

Issue #61 just came out with my images from the New York Asian Film Festival. Here is the Tokyo Gore Police spread:

Tokyo Gore Police, Giant Robot © Doug Kim

Tokyo Gore Police (Yoshihiro Nishimura, Noboru Iguchi), Giant Robot © Doug Kim

Tokyo Gore Police, Giant Robot © Doug Kim

Tokyo Gore Police (Noboru Iguchi, Yoshihiro Nishimura, Tak Sakaguchi), Giant Robot © Doug Kim


Seven Samurai | Polish Posters

On the Criterion DVD, there is a short gallery of posters from around the world for the initial release of Seven Samurai in 1954. The two Polish posters are absolutely striking. For comparison, I’ve added the American one sheet, which is not bad at all when compared to the boring fare we have to look at today.

Movie one sheets are the results of consensus and compromise. Posters are the main vehicles for marketing campaigns to build awareness and drive audiences to the theaters. That is what makes these Polish posters so noteworthy because they have the feel of personal interpretations of the movie by single artists.

Polish poster for <i>Seven Samurai</i>, 1954

Polish poster for Seven Samurai, 1954

Poster for the first Polish release of Seven Samurai, 1954. Created by Marian Stachurski in a faux woodcut style.

Poster for the first Polish release of Seven Samurai, 1954. Created by Marian Stachurski in a faux woodcut style.

The US one sheet.

The US one sheet.

Go buy the Criterion edition of Seven Samurai right now.

It is one of the best films ever made and a film that for me, even with repeated viewings, still has many gifts to reveal.


Leica Sighting | Coraline

Leica camera owners are the worst of the gear fetishists in the photography world. I count myself among them…to a certain extent. Obsessing over serial numbers, special alligator skin models and collapsible lens hoods is small talk for us.

The use of Leicas in movies is something I count as a geeky guilty pleasure, though nothing will take me out of a movie quicker than when I spot an M8 or a screw mount lens.

What has to be the coolest movie sighting of a Leica so far is the appearance of one in the stop-motion animated film of Neil Gaiman’s Coraline. Only a camera fetishist would go to the lengths required to construct a miniature M3. And a true Leica fetishist would make sure that when Coraline looks through the viewfinder, the POV through the viewfinder had the single M3 50mm frame line exactly where it should be.

I cannot take credit for the identification of the model nor of the frame lines’ accuracy. That came from the Leica Users Group.

Picture 9

Coraline 2009

Picture 10

The camera strap and the specific way it folds under above the rings is dead on. Coraline 2009

the frame lines for the 50mm in the M3

the frame lines for the 50mm in the M3

See, rent or buy Coraline now. It is a wonderful film and is so far the closest Neil Gaiman has come to having a film successfully convey his singular magic and imagination.


The New York Asian Film Festival

Meeting and shooting some of the directors at this year’s Asian Film Festival was such a treat. These guys were completely ego-less and wanting to try any and every goofy idea possible. They had even flown to the states with their own props.

Good times.

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Noboru Iguchi on the left, Yoshihiro Nishimura in the skull hat, Tak Sakaguchi getting it in the gut © Doug Kim

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Yoshihiro Nishimura, special effects director of Tokyo Gore Police, Machine Gun Girl, Vampire Girl vs. Frankenstein Girl © Doug Kim

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Tak Sakaguchi, one of Japan's biggest action stars and now feature film director with two new flicks: Be a Man! Samurai School and Yoroi Samurai Zombie © Doug Kim

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the one and only Noboru Iguchi, director of Machine Gun Girl © Doug Kim

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Yoshihiro Nishimura, hacksaw, some meat and two butchers © Doug Kim