Mark Kurlansky | Woodcut Prints

Posted: January 19th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Books, History, Painting, Quotes

Where Am I Going? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

Where Am I Going? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

In every age, people are certain that only the things they have deemed valuable have true value. The search for love and the search for wealth are always the two best stories. But while a love story is timeless, the story of a quest for wealth, given enough time, will always seem like the vain pursuit of a mirage.

- Mark Kurlansky, Salt

Who Is It? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

Who Is It? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

At times it sees that the search for good health has taken all the pleasure out of life. It has stripped us of butter, cream, marbled red meat, pork, and goose fat, not to mention alcohol and fine, hand-rolled cigars. And just when you settle on your favorite healthful fish, you’re told it’s laced with mercury. Sometimes it feels as though we would be better off being less healthy and enjoying life.

But then, miraculously, there is olive oil. Olive oil, it seems, is the only really good food we are still allowed.

- Mark Kurlansky from “Essential Oil,” Bon Appétit, November 2008

What Does She Want? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

What Does She Want? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

I always wanted to be a writer and I had in my head that a writer should either go to sea or go to war. There was a war available at the time but the sea was a much better idea. I did it for a couple of summers, to earn money for college.

My most memorable job was on a lobster boat. I was a pretty strong kid and they just needed someone who could haul pots on 200ft of line. We didn’t have a radio; sometimes you’d hear this roar, see a dark shadow and realise a freighter was bearing down on you. I never gave one thought to how dangerous it was. I absolutely loved it.

Many years later I was on a commercial fishing boat as a reporter and I wondered why the hell I’d liked it so much.

- Mark Kurlansky

Do I Make Any More Sense Than This Painting? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

Do I Make Any More Sense Than This Painting? Woodcut print by Mark Kurlansky

While I write, I drink a lot of espresso. I have an espresso maker in my office. In one of my books, I gave an acknowledgment to caffeine.

- Mark Kurlansky


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Daniel Webster | Party Chowder

Posted: January 17th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Books, Film, History, Photography, Quotes

Photograph by Anita Conti / Agence Vu / Aurora Photos

Photograph by Anita Conti / Agence Vu / Aurora Photos

Taken from Mark Kurlansky’s amazing book Cod: A Biography of the Fish that Changed the World.

Party Chowder

Take a cod of ten pounds, well cleaned, leaving on the skin. Cut into pieces one and a half pounds thick, preserving the head whole. Take one and a half pounds of clear, fat salt pork, cut into thin slices. Do the same with twelve potatoes. Take the largest pot you have. Try out the pork first, then take out the pieces of pork, leaving in the drippings. Add to that three parts of water, a layer of fish, so as to cover the bottom of the pot; next a layer of potatoes, then two tablespoons of salt, 1 teaspoon of peepper, then the pork, another layer of fish, and the remainder of the potatoes.

Fill the pot with water to cover the ingredients. Put over a good fire. Let the chowder boil twenty-five minutes. When this is done have a quart of boiling milk ready, and ten hard crackers split and dipped in cold water. Add milk and crackers. Let the whole boil five minutes. Then chowder is then ready to be first-rate if you have followed the directions. An onion may be aded if you like the flavor.

This chowder is suitable for a large fishing party.

- Daniel Webster, from The New England Yankee Cookbook, edited by Imogene Wolcott, 1939

Photo courtesy Provincial Archives of Newfoundland and Labrador

Photo courtesy Provincial Archives of Newfoundland and Labrador


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Mario Testino | Kate Moss by Mario Testino

Posted: December 1st, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Books, Photography, Quotes

Mario Testino’s monograph / testimonial to Kate Moss was released in September 2010 in a limited run of 1,500 signed copies, each going for $2,000.

 

I met Kate very early on. Shortly after her first Galliano show I went backstage to congratulate her, only to find her crying: she was disappointed that she had only been given one outfit to model in the show. My answer to her was this: ‘In life there are perfumes and colognes. You need to use lots of cologne as the scent fades away; with a perfume you just use a drop and it lasts all night. You are a perfume, you will go on and on.’ Little did I know just how true that would become! And that I had made a friend for life.

- Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

I thought it was on a shoot for French Glamour [that Mario and I first met], but he always says it was when I did a John Galliano show and I was crying on the steps or something.

- Kate Moss

 

Kate Moss by Mario Testino for Vogue Brazil May 2011

Kate Moss by Mario Testino for Vogue Brazil May 2011

Mario took me to a new level of glamour. I don’t think anybody had seen me as any kind of sexy model before he did. He was the one that transformed me. Before him I was just a grungy girl, but he saw me differently. He was the first to say ‘Oh, she’s quite sexy. I’ve seen her out! I know she’s not just that grungy girl.’ He’d seen me in a pair of heels, getting glamorous – and he was the first to start taking pictures of me in that way. He changed the way people thought about me as a model, for sure. Later other people started working with me in that way, but he was the first.

- Kate Moss

 

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

She lives more fully than anyone else I know.

- Mario Testino

 

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

This is just a couple of months ago. We were doing photos and we were hungry, so she made an omelette. She’s quick at making an omelette! It was a moment. Kate’s very loose with her body – not in a negative way, but in a comfortable way. I come from Peru and had a Catholic upbringing. I wasn’t raised to be comfortable with nudity. British people are a funny mix. They pretend to be prudish but they can be pretty decadent – as long as you close enough doors. I guess Kate doesn’t need the closed doors. She’s just free. It’s her nature.

- Mario Testino

 

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

This is not the picture I was meant to do, it’s an in-between picture. We were doing shoot and I said: ‘All right I’ve got it’, and shy threw herself back on the bed, my paparazzi side came out – and this is the picture. It’s a relaxing shot between striking the pose. It’s where you get to see our relationship, where it’s not the magazine, or the editorial. It’s about us. Kate’s confidence is magical because it’s full of insecurities – she’s very frail. Even when she’s trying to be most sexy grown –up, the childishness in her always come out. I feel very protective towards her.

- Mario Testino

 

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

I have never laughed so much in my whole life as with Mario on shoots. Sometimes we know we have to stop but we just can’t, we can’t even look at each other.

- Kate Moss

 

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

I guess back when we met I did not realize she would become an icon of the ‘now’ for so many people. All I could see or feel was an attraction to someone a lot younger than me.

- Mario Testino

 

Lila Grace and Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Lila Grace and Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

… and I like the pictures [in this book] of me and Lila too. At the time they were taken, she was really young, and I didn’t want the press intruding on her, they were too private… but now the pictures are nostalgic for me.

- Kate Moss

 

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

We have been trying to work out exactly where this party is [the image below]. I think it is in New York, but it could be London or Cannes. It’s a long time ago, but I know this face so well – you know, with the mouth wide open when you scream hello. I’ve know Kate for over 20 years (our first job was for France Glamour when she was only 15) and the friendship I share with her is very intense. It’s different sort of friendship. It’s not like I see her every weekend, or we go out every night, but when we see each other. It’s always the same. This image encapsulates how I see Kate. It’s totally her. She’s so at ease. That’s the side I like. I like her sexy, and I her different, but many of those sides are a front. This is the reality.

- Mario Testino

 

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

In the press people say “oh, there she is… she’s out again”, and they don’t see me getting up and going to work every day. They just print pictures of me coming out of a party or whatever… I’ve worked hard for 20 years and I’m still working now! The book has a really good balance of work and play and shows that the fashion industry is not the completely vicious place it is so often made out to be. I don’t think it is at all.

- Kate Moss

 

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

This was taken in my office while doing a story for Italian vogue. I wanted to bring Kate into my world and photograph her in a way that redressed her, so we decided to do the shoot using the portrait on my book. I carried on taking pictures after we had finished and this is one of those. The picture she is holding was the poster for my exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery. It’s become quite an iconic picture for us, because the exhibition has travelled all over the word and she has always been the face of the show. I thought it was cute to do her quite real, in this way, but with this face.

- Mario Testino

 

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

Kate Moss by Mario Testino © Mario Testino

This was shot at the Royal Opera House for American vogue. It didn’t appear in the magazine, we just did it for a laugh. Kate was asking: ‘How would I have been if I was a dancer? With the tutu and a crown on? She’s so sweet like that ,no? She is you all- time English girl, I love her because she doesn’t come from money. She comes from a very normal background. I’ve always found that’s made her quite balanced. And as much as I can appreciate her style and her beauty, the thing that has made our relationship is her sense of humor. We laugh a lot. All the time. That is our relationship, I guess.

- Mario Testino


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Paul Jasmin | California Dreaming

Posted: November 27th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Books, Los Angeles, Photography, Quotes

Paul Jasmin, a Los Angeles based photographer and instructor at Pasadena’s Art Center, has a new book out, California Dreaming.

Jason Wilder, California Dreaming © Paul Jasmin 2007

Jason Wilder, California Dreaming © Paul Jasmin 2007

Many of the photographs have been shot in and around my apartment on Wilshire Blvd. A lot of them where done just a bit more than one year ago, especially for the book. So most of the images are from the last two years.

- Paul Jasmin

Haddawy Home, California Dreaming © Paul Jasmin 2006

Haddawy Home, California Dreaming © Paul Jasmin 2006

The older I get, the more I realize that it´s all about dreams. That´s why I like California – it´s all about dreaming. Especially when your young, it´s the dream that keeps you going. That´s what I enjoy taking pictures of, these young people, dreamers, striving to become an actor, a model or an artist. Many of the images in the book are of kids of friends.

- Paul Jasmin

Laura, California Dreaming © Paul Jasmin 2009

Laura, California Dreaming © Paul Jasmin 2009

All my images are from a movie in one way or another. It´s a sort of romanticism. They reflects alot of me in that age – I was born in Montana but I wanted to go to Hollywod and become an actor.

- Paul Jasmin

Paul Jasmin’s Home, California Dreaming © Paul Jasmin 2009

Paul Jasmin’s Home, California Dreaming © Paul Jasmin 2009

Stas, California Dreaming © Paul Jasmin 2006

Stas, California Dreaming © Paul Jasmin 2006

Chateau Marmont, California Dreaming © Paul Jasmin 2008

Chateau Marmont, California Dreaming © Paul Jasmin 2008

Jonelle, California Dreaming © Paul Jasmin 2009

Jonelle, California Dreaming © Paul Jasmin 2009

Valeria, Lancaster, California Dreaming © Paul Jasmin 2008

Valeria, Lancaster, California Dreaming © Paul Jasmin 2008

Teresa, California Dreaming © Paul Jasmin 2007

Teresa, California Dreaming © Paul Jasmin 2007

Jerreth, California Dreaming © Paul Jasmin, 2009

Jerreth, California Dreaming © Paul Jasmin, 2009


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André Kertész | Ballet, New York City, 1938

Posted: November 25th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Books, Film, New York City, Photography, Quotes

Ballet, New York City, 1938 © André Kertész

Ballet, New York City, 1938 © André Kertész

Once I worked with the American Ballet. I started arranging my primitive lights when a voice shouted, “Stop, you have no right to put any lights here. You are not in the union.” “What do you mean?” “I said, “these are my lights; I am doing my work.” “You have no right.” I lost my patience and shouted back, “This is my daily work, my daily bread. You eat, I want to east, too.” He won the battle, and I was not happy.

Much later on I wanted to do something my way—with my conception—without complications. I took the dancers along and photographed them on a children’s playground dancing. Some children were playing hide-and-seek and the dancers started to mix with the children. Look at the adoration of the children in the picture. This was a fantastic moment captured in a photo. The dancer, which is the glamour, and the children. the publicity manager sent the photos over to Life magazine. They came back to one and a half years later: “We do not find a place for using them.”

- André Kertész, Kertész on Kertész


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André Kertész | Paris, 1925

Posted: November 17th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Books, Film, Photography, Quotes

Paris, 1925 © André Kertész

Paris, 1925 © André Kertész

One day my mother said, “If you want to go to Paris, go.” This was a great moment in my life. It was 1925. Arriving late at night, I and two other Hungarian boys took a room in a hotel. We were very tired, but next morning I looked out of the window and say my first subject. I knew no one in Paris, but I soon made friends.

- André Kertész, Kertész on Kertész


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André Kertész | Elizabeth and Me, Paris 1931

Posted: November 11th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Books, Film, Photography, Quotes

Elizabeth and Me, Paris, 1931 © André Kertész

Elizabeth and Me, Paris, 1931 © André Kertész

 

I took the photo of Elizabeth and myself in the early 1930s. Of course, we also took a picture of the two of us together, but this is the one I like—just her and my hand. At the time I had a little self-timing device and I used it so I could get into the picture. I had found it in 1914 in Hungary and I still have it.

- André Kertész, Kertész on Kertész


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John Keegan | The Battle of Trafalgar

Posted: November 1st, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Books, History, Quotes

The Battle of Trafalgar, The Price of Admiralty by John Keegan, 1989

The Battle of Trafalgar, The Price of Admiralty by John Keegan, 1989

All the rigging was cut to pieces, the masts damaged by a number of shot, the guns in the upper decks dismounted. I was wounded by a splinter….the Admiral [Villeneuve] ordered the few men remaining on the upper decks—they were now useless, having no guns left and no rigging to work, all being cut to pieces—to go below to the 24-pounder gundeck. The enemy ships appeared to leeeward of us; they were followed by the rest of the line…two 74s were on our beam, very close to windward, into whom we fired as vigorously as possible; the main and mizen masts fell, shot through and masked the starboard side, the colours were secured to the stump of the mainmast; the 24-pounder battery was totally dismounted and the 36-pounder battery had lost very many men, all the hands still able to serve were sent there; worked to clear away the masts from the ship so as to be able to make use of the 36-pounder battery…The ship, having only the foremast standing, fell away and broke her jib-boom against the Santissima Trinidad, they being very close together…an instant later our foremast fell…Our rigging completely dismanteld, totally mismasted, having lost all our men in the upper works, the 24-pounder battery entirely dismounted and abandoned…the starboard side masked by the masts; unable to defend ourselves, having nearly 450 men killed and wounded; not being supported by any ship…not even having a boat in which [the admiral] might put off [to shift his flag], all of them having been riddled with shot as well as the one which we had kept, covered before the battle, we were cut off in the midst of 5 enemy ships which were pouring a very hot fire into us. I went on deck again at the moment when Admiral Villeneuve was constrained to strike [surrender], to prevent the further slaughter of brave men without the power of retaliating, which was done after three and a quarter hours of the most furious action, nearly always at pistol range. The relics of the Eagle were thrown into the sea, as were also all the signals.

- Captain Jean-Jacques Magendie of the Bucentaure

From John Keegan’s seminal, masterful The Price of Admiralty.


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Josef Koudelka | Gypsies

Posted: October 28th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Books, Film, Photography, Quotes

Finally.

After 35 years, Koudelka’s amazing Gypsies has been released in a new edition by Aperture. With 30 never before seen images and a design that reflects Koudelka’s original intentions, the book is a gorgeous testament to the life of the Roma between 1962 and 1971 in Bohemia, Moravia, Slovakia, Romania, Hungary, France and Spain. After being out of print for so many years, I can finally stop my ceaseless hunting in used bookstores, sit back on the couch, and let Koudelka’s eye take me through the lives of the Roma 40 years ago.

Personally, I have had the good fortune of always being able to do what I wanted, never working for others. Maybe it is a silly principle, but the idea that no one can buy me is important for me. I refuse assignments, even for projects that I have decided to do anyhow. It is somewhat the same with my books. When my first book, the one on the gypsies, was published, it was hard for me to accept the idea that I could no longer choose the people to whom I would show my photos, that any one could buy them.

- Josef Koudelka

Slovakia, 1967. From the book, Koudelka: Gypsies. © Josef Koudelka, Magnum Photos

Slovakia, 1967. From the book, Koudelka: Gypsies. © Josef Koudelka, Magnum Photos

If a picture is good, it tells many different stories.

- Josef Koudelka

Bohemia, 1966. From the book, Koudelka: Gypsies. © Josef Koudelka, Magnum Photos

Bohemia, 1966. From the book, Koudelka: Gypsies. © Josef Koudelka, Magnum Photos

I was never paid for anything in Czechoslovakia, so it was easy to accept not being paid in the West. Also, I was used to a lower living standard.

- Josef Koudelka

France, 1970. From the book, Koudelka: Gypsies. © Josef Koudelka, Magnum Photos

France, 1970. From the book, Koudelka: Gypsies. © Josef Koudelka, Magnum Photos

For me, the most beautiful thing is to wake up, to go out, and to look. At everything. Without anyone telling me “You should look at this or that.” I look at everything and I try to find what interests me, because when I set out, I don’t yet know what will interest me. Sometimes I photograph things that others would find stupid, but with which I can play around. Henri as well says that before meeting a person, or seeing a country, he has to prepare himself. Not me, I try to react to what comes up. Afterwards, I may come back to it, perhaps every year, ten years in a row, and I will end by understanding.

- Josef Koudelka

Spain, 1971. From the book, Koudelka: Gypsies. © Josef Koudelka, Magnum Photos

Spain, 1971. From the book, Koudelka: Gypsies. © Josef Koudelka, Magnum Photos

When I travel, I don’t even know where I am going to sleep, I don’t think of the place where I will lie down until the moment I roll out my sleeping bag. It’s a rule that I’ve set for myself. Because I told myself that I must be able to sleep anywhere, since sleep is important. In the summer I often sleep outdoors. I stop working when there is no more light, and I start again in the early morning. I do not feel this to be a sacrifice, it would be a sacrifice to live otherwise. As for my points of reference, I don’t know what they would be.

- Josef Koudelka


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André Kertész | The Distortions, 1933

Posted: March 11th, 2011 | Author: | Filed under: Books, Film, Photography

Distortion Number 40, Andre Kertesz

Distortion Number 40, Andre Kertesz

A Hungarian friend of mine introduced me to the editor of the magazine “Le Sourire,” a very French sort of magazine–satiric, risqué. Many artists worked for this publication. They had never published photos before. The editor asked me to do something. I bought two distorting mirrors in the flea market–the kind of thing you find in amusement parks. With existing light and an old lens invented by Hugo Meyer, I achieved amusing impressions. Some images like sculptures, others grotesque and frightening. I took about 140 photographs in a month, working two or three times a week. “Le Sourire” published a couple of them, and we planned a book, but it had to wait forty years to be published–but that is another story.

-André Kertész, Kertész on Kertész


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