Monthly Archives: October 2011
Sunset Junction 2002 | Sonic Youth
Kim Gordon, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak Tri-X

Kim Gordon, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak Tri-X

Thurston Moore, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak E200

Thurston Moore, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak E200

Thurston Moore, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak E200

Thurston Moore, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak E200

Kim Gordon, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak Tri-X

Kim Gordon, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak Tri-X

Steve Shelley, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak Tri-X

Steve Shelley, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak Tri-X

Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak Tri-X

Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak Tri-X

Kim Gordon, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak Tri-X

Kim Gordon, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak Tri-X

Kim Gordon, Thurston Moore, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak Tri-X

Kim Gordon, Thurston Moore, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak Tri-X

Kim Gordon, Thurston Moore, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak E200

Kim Gordon, Thurston Moore, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak E200

Kim Gordon, Thurston Moore, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak E200

Kim Gordon, Thurston Moore, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak E200

Lee Ranaldo, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak E200

Lee Ranaldo, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak E200

Kim Gordon, Thurston Moore, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak Tri-X

Kim Gordon, Thurston Moore, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak Tri-X

Lee Ranaldo, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak E200

Lee Ranaldo, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak E200

Lee Ranaldo, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak Tri-X

Lee Ranaldo, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak Tri-X

Thurston Moore, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak E200

Thurston Moore, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak E200

Thurston Moore, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak E200

Thurston Moore, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak E200

Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak Tri-X

Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak Tri-X

Lee Ranaldo, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak E200

Lee Ranaldo, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak E200

Lee Ranaldo, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak E200

Lee Ranaldo, Sonic Youth, Sunset Junction 2002 © Doug Kim; Nikon F5, Nikkor 80-20mm, Kodak E200


Sonic Youth | Kim & Thurston

I was 28; Thurston was 23, I think. I’d never really gone out with anyone younger than me, but I thought, “Well, why not? Nothing else has worked.

– Kim Gordon

The Moore family for Marc Jacobs © Juergen Teller 2003

The Moore family for Marc Jacobs © Juergen Teller 2003

There’s no secret. We’ve never sold each other out on anything. I can easily follow the allure of wanting to go out and be with the boys, and play industrial noise and smoke pot and drink, but nothing replaces the reality of our relationship. I can’t trade that for anything. I can’t think of how or where I’d be without Kim’s influence. And we’re like any couple that’s been together for close to 30 years. There’s a genuine psychophysical connection. Sometimes I feel things happening in me, and I know that something’s going on with her. When you’re married and you have that kind of connection, you become really spiritually, psychologically connected. We grew up together, in a way.

– Thurston Moore, Spin, 2008

Kim Gordon and Thurston Moore illustration for New York Magazine © Martin Ansin

Kim Gordon and Thurston Moore illustration for New York Magazine © Martin Ansin

I didn’t think anything of it, ‘cause I’d been set up on a couple of dates before and they’d, like, have the lights low and cheese and wine, but they knew nothing about the Ramones, and I would just be like, “l gotta get the fuck outta here.” But l do remember meeting her at this little No Wave hangout, and I remember immediately thinking that she was cool. We were talking about music and art, but I didn’t really think there was any future there, and then I saw her again in the next few days and I was attracted to her but was a little too immature and shy to make any kind of move. And she had a dog, too, that was really kind of fascinating

– Thurston Moore

Kim Gordon, Thurston Moore in Coco's bedroom at their home in Massachusetts © Aliya Naumoff

Kim Gordon, Thurston Moore in Coco's bedroom at their home in Massachusetts © Aliya Naumoff

When asked in a 2007 interview with Rolling Stone, who was the coolest famous person he’d ever met, Moore answered:

It would have to be Kim G! For sure. Believe me, she was unbelievable when I first met her. She wore this sort of hip prison-stripe outfit and flip-up shades on her glasses. She had a ponytail, a little ponytail that was sort of center at the back of her head and I thought, ‘That’s the coolest fucking person I’ve ever met.’

 Kim Gordon and Thurston Moore in November 1995, © John Zich/TIME LIFE

Kim Gordon and Thurston Moore in November 1995, © John Zich/TIME LIFE

Thurston had this charismatic vibe that he put out… he has a golden glow about him, and he was cute.

– Kim Gordon

Kim Gordon & Thurston Moore, Sonic Youth at CBGB © Stephanie Chernikowski, 1983, Courtesy The Museum of Modern Art

Kim Gordon & Thurston Moore, Sonic Youth at CBGB © Stephanie Chernikowski, 1983, Courtesy The Museum of Modern Art

Kim wore glasses with flip-up shades and had an Australian sheepdog named Egan. She had an off-center ponytail and wore a blue-and-white-striped shirt and pants outfit. She had beautiful eyes and the most beautiful smile and was very intelligent and seemed to have a sensitive/spiritual intellect.

She seemed to really like me. I definitely liked her, but was scared, as always, to make a move. I was afraid to kiss her. We walked around a couple of times. One night, it got late and we were eating at Leshko’s, and I think she wanted me to ask her over. I only lived up the street. So we parted. She would take the subway, staying at gallery owner Anina Nosei’s place. Before she split, she actually touched my arm (!) and said, “See you later.”

She moved into a raw railway apartment on Eldridge Street, below Grand Street. The artist Dan
Graham lived upstairs and had acquired the place for her. She invited me over one evening and I played this beat-up guitar she had. I knew the guitar because it belonged to an associate of the Coachmen gang, who left it at Jenny Holzer’s loft, where Kim had stayed, and somehow it was passed on to her. All she had was the guitar and a foam-rubber cushion for sleeping. That night was the first time we kissed.

– Thurston Moore

Kim, Coco Hayley, Thurston, photographer unknown

Kim, Coco Hayley, Thurston, photographer unknown


Washington Square | August

I have been slacking on getting my film developed which means that I receive negs and proof sheets in batches, sometimes spanning a period of months, images and contact sheets containing forgotten narratives and distant days.

These shots are from August, during a fantastically hot stretch. The heat index hit 115 one day. I did not stop sweating until September.

Washington Square, New York © Doug Kim; Leica MP 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X

Washington Square, New York © Doug Kim; Leica MP 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X

Washington Square, New York © Doug Kim; Leica MP 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X

Washington Square, New York © Doug Kim; Leica MP 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X

Washington Square, New York © Doug Kim; Leica MP 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X

Washington Square, New York © Doug Kim; Leica MP 0.58, 35mm Summicron, Kodak Tri-X


Josef Koudelka | Gypsies

Finally.

After 35 years, Koudelka’s amazing Gypsies has been released in a new edition by Aperture. With 30 never before seen images and a design that reflects Koudelka’s original intentions, the book is a gorgeous testament to the life of the Roma between 1962 and 1971 in Bohemia, Moravia, Slovakia, Romania, Hungary, France and Spain. After being out of print for so many years, I can finally stop my ceaseless hunting in used bookstores, sit back on the couch, and let Koudelka’s eye take me through the lives of the Roma 40 years ago.

Personally, I have had the good fortune of always being able to do what I wanted, never working for others. Maybe it is a silly principle, but the idea that no one can buy me is important for me. I refuse assignments, even for projects that I have decided to do anyhow. It is somewhat the same with my books. When my first book, the one on the gypsies, was published, it was hard for me to accept the idea that I could no longer choose the people to whom I would show my photos, that any one could buy them.

– Josef Koudelka

Slovakia, 1967. From the book, Koudelka: Gypsies. © Josef Koudelka, Magnum Photos

Slovakia, 1967. From the book, Koudelka: Gypsies. © Josef Koudelka, Magnum Photos

If a picture is good, it tells many different stories.

– Josef Koudelka

Bohemia, 1966. From the book, Koudelka: Gypsies. © Josef Koudelka, Magnum Photos

Bohemia, 1966. From the book, Koudelka: Gypsies. © Josef Koudelka, Magnum Photos

I was never paid for anything in Czechoslovakia, so it was easy to accept not being paid in the West. Also, I was used to a lower living standard.

– Josef Koudelka

France, 1970. From the book, Koudelka: Gypsies. © Josef Koudelka, Magnum Photos

France, 1970. From the book, Koudelka: Gypsies. © Josef Koudelka, Magnum Photos

For me, the most beautiful thing is to wake up, to go out, and to look. At everything. Without anyone telling me “You should look at this or that.” I look at everything and I try to find what interests me, because when I set out, I don’t yet know what will interest me. Sometimes I photograph things that others would find stupid, but with which I can play around. Henri as well says that before meeting a person, or seeing a country, he has to prepare himself. Not me, I try to react to what comes up. Afterwards, I may come back to it, perhaps every year, ten years in a row, and I will end by understanding.

– Josef Koudelka

Spain, 1971. From the book, Koudelka: Gypsies. © Josef Koudelka, Magnum Photos

Spain, 1971. From the book, Koudelka: Gypsies. © Josef Koudelka, Magnum Photos

When I travel, I don’t even know where I am going to sleep, I don’t think of the place where I will lie down until the moment I roll out my sleeping bag. It’s a rule that I’ve set for myself. Because I told myself that I must be able to sleep anywhere, since sleep is important. In the summer I often sleep outdoors. I stop working when there is no more light, and I start again in the early morning. I do not feel this to be a sacrifice, it would be a sacrifice to live otherwise. As for my points of reference, I don’t know what they would be.

– Josef Koudelka


Kruger National Park | Lion Cubs

I never shoot wildlife because well, I am never out in the wild.

Hired by a corporate client a few years ago to document their game drives in the gorgeous Kruger Concession in South Africa, I spent ten days in the bush, going on three game drives a day. The math for shooting wildlife is simple: get the longest lens possible, hire the best guide possible and display a shit ton of patience while you wait.

This shot is drippingly cute and it is the result of patience and luck and my longest lens. I was sitting in a Land Rover and we were surrounded by lions, lounging in the mid-day sun. Had I been in a different seat, the angle would not have allowed this line up of cubs.

Lion Cubs, Kruger National Park, South Africa © Doug Kim; Nikon D300, Nikkor 80-200mm

Lion Cubs, Kruger National Park, South Africa © Doug Kim; Nikon D300, Nikkor 80-200mm


Leica Sighting | The Anniversary Party
Jennifer Beals and an M4-2 and a 35mm Summilux-M ASPH in The Anniversary Party 2001

Jennifer Beals and an M4-2 and a 35mm Summilux-M ASPH in The Anniversary Party 2001

Jennifer Beals, John Benjamin Hickey, and an M4-2 and a 35mm Summilux-M ASPH in The Anniversary Party 2001

Jennifer Beals, John Benjamin Hickey, and an M4-2 and a 35mm Summilux-M ASPH in The Anniversary Party 2001

Jennifer Beals, Alan Cumming, Jennifer Jason Leigh, and an M4-2 and a 35mm Summilux-M ASPH in The Anniversary Party 2001

Jennifer Beals, Alan Cumming, Jennifer Jason Leigh, and an M4-2 and a 35mm Summilux-M ASPH in The Anniversary Party 2001

Information pulled from the great Leica FAQ site.

Jennifer Beals is an avid photographer and Leica shooter. Click here for more information about Jennifer Beals’ photography.