From the introduction to the Photo-Eye edition of Suo Sarumawashi:

Sarumawashi, literally “monkey dancing” evolved over a 1000-year history in Japan. Ancient Japanese chronicles refer to it as a form of religious ritual designed to protect the horses of warriors. It later developed into a popular form of festival entertainment, and was performed all over Japan from temples to imperial courts. Today, Sarumawashi is ranked alongside Noh and Kabuki as one of the oldest and most traditional of Japan’s performing arts. It features acrobatic stunts and comedic skits performed by highly trained macaque monkeys.

Choromatsu 2, Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

Choromatsu 2, Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

Choromatsu, Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

Choromatsu, Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

"Kanpei Counting Fingers", Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

Kanpei Counting Fingers, Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

"Kojiro 2", Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

Kojiro 2, Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

"Big in Bucket", Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

Big in Bucket, Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

"Genki", Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

Genki, Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

"Kojiro and Kurimatsu", Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

Kojiro and Kurimatsu, Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

"Aikichi 2", Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

Aikichi 2, Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

"Aikichi", Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

Aikichi, Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

"Aikichi with Bamboo Steve", Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

Aikichi with Bamboo Steve, Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

"Fukunosuke 2", Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

Fukunosuke 2, Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

"Fukunosuke", Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe

Fukunosuke, Suo Sarumawashi by Hiroshi Watanabe