Monthly Archives: March 2010
Union Square | Free Cocaine

I was standing outside Steak Frites on 16th Street, smoking a cigarette, waiting for my friend to come out when a well-dressed gentleman exited the restaurant and asked me if I wanted to take some coke off his hands. Sure. Why not? Those days were long over for me but free is free. Coke is just the rich man’s coffee but I have rich friends that wouldn’t have minded a gift bag. He said that he had too much and that he and his wife were fighting. He palm passed it to me and on cue, his wife appeared and gave me the stink eye.

Free drugs on the street. What kind of town is this? But no worries. On the way to meeting my friends in the LES on Friday night, I actually lost the little glassine bag and my Klipsch ear bud headphones somewhere on Houston near the F train.

What a moron.

Free cocaine. Someone got a gift on Houston St. last night

Free cocaine. Someone got a gift on Houston St. last night


Henri Cartier-Bresson | Germany, Part One

Above all, I craved to seize the whole essence, in the confines of one single photograph, of some situation that was in the process of unrolling itself before my eyes.

-Henri Cartier-Bresson

HAMBURG, West Germany—Around the neck of a young man hangs a sign that reads, "I am looking for any kind of work," December 1952-January 1953. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

HAMBURG, West Germany—Around the neck of a young man hangs a sign that reads, "I am looking for any kind of work," December 1952-January 1953. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

DESSAU, Germany—A transit camp, located between the American and Soviet zones, was organized for refugees, political prisoners, POWs, forced laborers, and displaced persons returning from the Eastern front of Germany after having been liberated by the Soviet army. A Belgian woman and former Gestapo informer, being identified as she tried to hide in the crowd, April 1945. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

DESSAU, Germany—A transit camp, located between the American and Soviet zones, was organized for refugees, political prisoners, POWs, forced laborers, and displaced persons returning from the Eastern front of Germany after having been liberated by the Soviet army. A Belgian woman and former Gestapo informer, being identified as she tried to hide in the crowd, April 1945. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

MUNICH, West Germany—Oktoberfest, 1961. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

MUNICH, West Germany—Oktoberfest, 1961. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

MUNICH, West Germany—Oktoberfest, 1961. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

MUNICH, West Germany—Oktoberfest, 1961. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

MUNICH, West Germany—Oktoberfest, 1961. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

MUNICH, West Germany—Oktoberfest, 1961. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

MUNICH, West Germany—Oktoberfest, 1961. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

MUNICH, West Germany—Oktoberfest, 1961. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

HAMBURG, West Germany—December 1952-January 1953. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos

HAMBURG, West Germany—December 1952-January 1953. © Henri Cartier-Bresson / Magnum Photos


Los Angeles | Culver City

The intersection of Sepulveda and Washington Boulevards in Culver City fifty years ago. I’ve driven through this intersection a thousand times. It could use a rocket ship and a big ass donut again.

LOS ANGELES—The corner of Sepulveda and Washington Boulevards in Culver City, 1960. © Dennis Stock / Magnum Photos

LOS ANGELES—The corner of Sepulveda and Washington Boulevards in Culver City, 1960. © Dennis Stock / Magnum Photos


André Kertész | Landing Pigeon, New York, 1960
André Kertész | <i>Landing Pigeon</i>

André Kertész | Landing Pigeon, New York, 1960

This was taken around 59th Street where they had demolished the houses, and I saw a pigeon flying in and out. The original idea for this photograph dates back to my days in Paris, where I also saw some old run-down houses and wanted to photograph them with a pigeon. But the pigeon never came. Here in New York I sat and waited. Time and time again I went back to the same place, but it was never right. Then one day I saw the lonely pigeon. I took maybe two or three pictures. The moment was here. I had waited maybe thirty years for that instant.

-André Kertész, Kertész on Kertész