Monthly Archives: September 2009
Helmut Newton | The Gunfighter Pose

You know, I loved always Gary Cooper as a gunfighter in High Noon. They are always ready to draw. They are always like this… Which means that the outline of the body, there is daylight behind them. When you have your hands there [on the body], you don’t see the outline of the body, the little waist, the big shoulders. So my models often stand exactly, or what I hope will be the gunfighter’s stance.

-Helmut Newton

Nadja Auermann by Helmut Newton

Nadja Auermann by Helmut Newton

Brigitte Nielsen by Helmut Newton

Brigitte Nielsen by Helmut Newton

Hugh Hefner's screening room by Helmut Newton

Hugh Hefner's screening room by Helmut Newton


Giant Robot | Tokyo Gore Police

Issue #61 just came out with my images from the New York Asian Film Festival. Here is the Tokyo Gore Police spread:

Tokyo Gore Police, Giant Robot © Doug Kim

Tokyo Gore Police (Yoshihiro Nishimura, Noboru Iguchi), Giant Robot © Doug Kim

Tokyo Gore Police, Giant Robot © Doug Kim

Tokyo Gore Police (Noboru Iguchi, Yoshihiro Nishimura, Tak Sakaguchi), Giant Robot © Doug Kim


Joe Sorren’s Paintings

I first became aware of Joe Sorren’s work at Storyopolis in West Hollywood, that amazing children’s bookstore which has since relocated to the valley. What other kids book store has original Dr. Seuss drawings and vintage New Yorker cartoons?

There were two pieces hanging on a column at Storyopolis that caught my eye. They were the two posted below, “Those Two Guys…” and “Opus” which are now available at La Luz de Jesus gallery in Los Feliz. Sorren’s work reminds me of those completely rare picture books I read as a kid that instead of simple adventures involving backyards and rabbits, were stories that were surreal and wild and scary and took me to places beyond what I could have imagined.

His paintings are a gentle moment of LSD lucidity with broad strokes of humor and playfulness and in each, underneath the surreal patina, a touch of something darker and sadder.

"Those Two Guys That Everyone Wishes They Had At Their Party", Joe Sorren

"Those Two Guys That Everyone Wishes They Had At Their Party", Joe Sorren

"Opus", Joe Sorren

"Opus", Joe Sorren

I love the fact that all bets are off when you paint; the idea that anything can happen captivates me.

-Joe Sorren

"Elliot's Attraction to All Things Uncertain", Joe Sorren

"Elliot's Attraction to All Things Uncertain", Joe Sorren

Joe-Sorren

Unknown Title, Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

Unknown Title, Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

Unknown Title, Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

Unknown Title, Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

Unknown Title, Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

"When She Was Camera", Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

Unknown Title, Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

"Bump", Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

"Astrea", Joe Sorren

I usually enter a painting with no ideas, and just begin applying paint to see what arrives. I find art to be most engaging when I am surprising myself. As long as I stay open for whatever to arrive, anything can show up for dinner.

-Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

"Anthologia", Joe Sorren

joe-sorren2

Unknown Title, Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

Unknown Title, Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

Unknown Title, Joe Sorren

Joe Sorren

"Jammer", Joe Sorren

"Glimmer", Joe Sorren

"Glimmer", Joe Sorren

"Butterflies", Joe Sorren

"Butterflies", Joe Sorren


Born Yogis | Korean Edition
The cover of the Korean edition of <i>Born Yogis</i> © Susie Arnett, Doug Kim

The cover of the Korean edition of Born Yogis © Susie Arnett, Doug Kim

I just received the Korean edition of our book Born Yogis in the mail yesterday. It is awesome on many levels.

First, the design aesthetic has changed to a high-end slick Asian magazine look, which is the photos presented plainly with very clean black text on white pages.

Second, the biggest surprise is that they took Ely off the cover and put Soul on instead. But then again, it is an Asian market so the exotic white baby with a bit of a Topanga ‘fro will market well. I apologize for the dirty scans but well, I was using a dirty scanner.

Still waiting for the Russian edition. And a copy of the German edition, come to think of it. More to come!

Kelly, from the Korean edition of <i>Born Yogis</i> © Susie Arnett, Doug Kim

Kelly, from the Korean edition of Born Yogis © Susie Arnett, Doug Kim

Forrest, from the Korean edition of <i>Born Yogis</i> © Susie Arnett, Doug Kim

Forrest, from the Korean edition of Born Yogis © Susie Arnett, Doug Kim


Brides & Window Light

Give me a beautiful bride, some window light, and a pocket full of B&W film and I will go to town all day long.

Heather Wade-Benderly, Nikon F5, 85mm f1.4, Kodak Tri-X, © Doug Kim

Heather Wade-Benderly, Nikon F5, 85mm f1.4, Kodak Tri-X, © Doug Kim

Heather Wade-Benderly, Nikon F5, 85mm f1.4, Kodak Tri-X, © Doug Kim

Heather Wade-Benderly, Nikon F5, 85mm f1.4, Kodak Tri-X, © Doug Kim

And while I’m at it, give me a rabbi and a window and I’ll still go to town.

Hot rabbi by the window, Nikon F5, 85mm f1.4, Kodak Tri-X, © Doug Kim

Nikon F5, 85mm f1.4, Kodak Tri-X, © Doug Kim

The hand of a hot rabbi, Nikon F5, 85mm f1.4, Kodak Tri-x,  Doug Kim

Nikon F5, 85mm f1.4, Kodak Tri-x, © Doug Kim


Gordon Parks | Long Haired Furs

This series from Life Magazine in 1952 sums up just one of the many contradictions and facets that made up Gordon Parks. Filmmaker, poet, writer, photographer, movie producer, cinematographer, magazine publisher, novelist, activist, choreographer, semi-pro basketball player, and composer. And those are the accomplishments of his that I can list just off the top of my head.

He was an amazing man and perhaps his greatest work of art was his life itself. Read his works, watch his movies, read about his life, view his images. He was truly an iconoclast.

Someone once described him as the “elegant photojournalist.” This may be true, but it is also a sadly narrow and tiny taste of his expansive talents.

What is truly remarkable is how he could compartmentalize his talents. The eyes and the mind behind these images were also behind Shaft, The Learning Tree, “American Gothic” and “The Emerging Man”.

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Life Magazine, Gordon Parks, 1952

You know, the camera is not meant just to show misery.

-Gordon Parks

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Life Magazine, Gordon Parks, 1952

There’s another horizon out there, one more horizon that you have to make for yourself and let other people discover it, and someone else will take it further on, you know.

-Gordon Parks

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Life Magazine, Gordon Parks, 1952

I bought my first camera in Seattle, Washington. Only paid about seven dollars and fifty cents for it.

-Gordon Parks

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Life Magazine, Gordon Parks, 1952

I haven’t even learned how to spell Renaissance yet.

-Gordon Parks

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Life Magazine, Gordon Parks, 1952

But all I know, it was a constant effort, a constant feeling that I must not fail, and I still have that. And now, I feel at 85, I really feel that I’m just ready to start.

-Gordon Parks

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Life Magazine, Gordon Parks, 1952

In New York growing up, you never saw a black person on the street, you never saw a black person in the store, you never saw them in a restaurant. It just didn’t exist. So when Gordon and I met, it was really without any boundaries. First of all, he was drop-dead good-looking. We just looked into each other’s eyes, and we were friends.

-Gloria Vanderbilt

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Life Magazine, Gordon Parks, 1952

Many times I wondered whether my achievement was worth the loneliness I experienced, but now I realize the price was small.

-Gordon Parks


Tuscany | Lucca

Lucca in Tuscany has some remarkable architecture, especially the great circular center of town and the old medieval city walls of the former city state. The birthplace of Puccini, this charming city is not as choked with tourists as other destinations in Tuscany are which can provide for some needed breathing room. It is well worth the day trip from Florence.

It is also where I learned of the great rivalry between Rome and Pisa and was taught this insult:

Better a corpse in your house than a Pisan at your doorstep.

It is even better to say it in Italian:

Meglio un morto in case che un Pisano all’uscio.

Lucca, Tuscany, Italy, Nikon D300

Lucca, Tuscany, Italy, Nikon D300 © Doug Kim

Lucca, Tuscany, Italy, Nikon D300

Lucca, Tuscany, Italy, Nikon D300 © Doug Kim

Lucca, Tuscany, Italy, Nikon D300

Lucca, Tuscany, Italy, Nikon D300 © Doug Kim

Lucca, Tuscany, Italy, Nikon D300

Lucca, Tuscany, Italy, Nikon D300 © Doug Kim

Lucca, Tuscany, Italy, Nikon D300

Lucca, Tuscany, Italy, Nikon D300 © Doug Kim


The Hamptons | The End of Summer

Labor Day weekend in The Hamptons.

Tim, Amagansett; Leica M6 TTL, 35mm summicron, Kodak Tri-X

Tim, Amagansett; Leica M6 TTL, 35mm summicron, Kodak Tri-X © Doug Kim

Deep summer is when laziness finds respectability.

-Sam Keen

Cullen, Amagansett; Leica M6 TTL, 35mm summicron, Kodak Tri-X

Cullen, Amagansett; Leica M6 TTL, 35mm summicron, Kodak Tri-X © Doug Kim

Till Summer folds her miracle-
As Women-do-their Gown-
Or Priests-adjust the Symbols-
When Sacrament-is done-

-Emily Dickinson

Ellie and Aubrey, Amagansett, Leica M6 TTL, 35mm summicron, Kodak Tri-X

Ella and Aubrey, Amagansett, Leica M6 TTL, 35mm summicron, Kodak Tri-X © Doug Kim

In summer, the song sings itself.

-William Carlos Williams